Pinus sibirica

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by katriona, Feb 16, 2011.

  1. katriona

    katriona Member

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    Hello...

    I am looking for some Siberian Pine (Pinus sibirica) seedlings/seeds or advice on where to find some for purchase... or whether this tree would even grow well here. I think our zone is similar to the tree's native climate.

    Anyways... any help would be great! I don't think this is a common tree available at you're everyday nursery.

    Thanks,

    Kate
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 17, 2011
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Pinus Sibirica (sp?)

    Plants have been sold in Oregon by several retail vendors, do not know if on the market in Canada. You may have to attempt to make your own arrangements to import some, if that dedicated to the effort.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Pinus Sibirica (sp?)

    By the way, if you have confused Thuja occidentalis 'Wareana' (Siberian arborvitae) with Pinus sibirica it should be possible to get that somewhere in Canada - it was still a very common item in cold parts of North America as late as the mid-1990s.

    And may still be.

    Or there could be another arborvitae, prevalent at outlets near you that would do just as well.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I'd doubt it would grow at all in the Vancouver area, it has been a consistent and repeated complete failure in the similar climate in Britain. Its native climate is more like Jasper or Dawson Creek.

    Swiss Pine Pinus cembra is very similar (almost indistinguishable) and would succeed well with you, and Macedonian Pine Pinus peuce even better.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    P. cembra seems liable to be on the market somewhere there, the other is not. In fact, I think I've never seen one here outside of the Seattle arboretum. The Plant Locator - Western Region (2004, Black-Eyed Susans/Timber, Portland) sourcebook gives one Oregon supplier for the species and one other Oregon nursery for a mere two cultivars of it. For P. cembra, on the other hand, it has multiple listings including those for multiple cultivars.
     
  6. Thean

    Thean Active Member 10 Years

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    Good Morning Ron and Michael,
    Is Pinus siberica syn with Pinus cembra var. Siberica? I know there were three plants of Pinus cembra var Siberica growing just on the outskirt of Edmonton.
    Peace
    Thean
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yes, Pinus cembra var. sibirica is a synonym of Pinus sibirica. The two are sufficiently similar that some botanists consider them to be just varieties of one species.
     
  8. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    I got my seeds from Sandeman Seeds out of France. But don't tell Ag Canada that.
    Also I think Rhora's Nut farm and Nursery in Ontario will send you bare-root young trees. I bought two each of three kinds: Sibirica, Pumila, and Koraensis, and I'd have to go out and dig them out of the snow to see which two trees survived. Pretty sure it was Sibirica.
    As for the seeds: great germination, but nothing made it into the second year.
    Michael F mentioned Swiss Stone Pine, P Cembra. I've got two that I think I got from Canadian tire about ten years ago. Haven't seen them on sale since, but they're doing well here if a little short in stature.
    Good luck.
    Carl
     
  9. katriona

    katriona Member

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    Cheers! Thanks for the info...
     
  10. katriona

    katriona Member

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    Well I've been reading the Ringing Cedars series and Pinus Sibirica is metioned a lot in this book. Not only for many health benefits from the seeds (aka pine nuts) but also the cedar nut oil and other things.

    Does anyone else know whether those super expensive pine nuts commonly found in supermarkets are specifically from P. Sibirica? Or do any other pines produce edible nuts? (all of them? only some of them? which ones?)

    Thanks again, Kate
     
  11. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    About 20 different species of pine have large seeds; all of them are used as pine nuts, though most only locally to where they are produced. The main commercial supplies are from Korean Pine Pinus koraiensis (mainly harvested in northern China), Stone Pine Pinus pinea (Mediterranean region), Chilghoza Pine Pinus gerardiana (Pakistan, Afghanistan), Colorado Pinyon Pinus edulis (USA), and Mexican Pinyon Pinus cembroides (Mexico). So look at the "Produce of Xxxxx" label on the packet, and from that you will be able to tell which species they are. Of these five major commercial species, Korean Pine is the most similar to Siberian Pine (very closely related).

    Note that 'cedar' in your book is a mistranslation of Russian 'кедр'; it should read 'pine'.
     
  12. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    We use pine nuts fairly frequently in our cooking in spite of the price, and without knowing about any health benefits. They just taste good. And the trees are pretty neat.
    For a few years now, I've been trying to push the envelope for survival of nut pines- hence the forum user name. I've tried Koraiensis, Cembra, Pinea, Armandii, Bungeana, Flexilis, and Sibirica from seed, of which Flexilis has done really well, and I think I may even have two 2 year old Sibirica under the snow. Germination was nearly 100% for Pinea, survival predictably nil. Fun nonetheless. From Rhora's bare root trees, I've tried Koraiensis (failed), Pumila (also failed) and Sibirica (now about 30" high-if the exposure of the upper 12" to 40 below hasn't killed them). My two CT Cembra are at least ten years old and apparently healthy, but not more than 30" high.
    Charles Rhora's farm is on the Niagara peninsula, I think, so any young trees he sends you should have a better chance in Maple Ridge than they do at Horse Creek Yukon.
    Carl
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Shouldn't do, they are from Siberia after all! In the wild, they take temperatures down to below -60°C.
     
  14. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

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    I have several tens of thousands of edible pine nuts undergoing stratification (see my pines in the PNW thread) in Squamish. If interested in some PM me.
     
  15. Madawaska

    Madawaska Member

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    Hi everyone,

    This is my first post. It is actually the Pinus sibirica that brought me to you. I have also been looking for viable Pinus Sibrica seeds. I want to start a pine nut grove in Madawaska County, new Brunswick (zone 3). I have a very small amateur tree nursery - more like a patch - but a limited budget so seeds are really my only option. I have written to at least a dozen people and no one has any. I found out this morning that the Russian Federation has banned export of viable seeds. I have found some seedlings for sale and would very much like to go that route... but being a full time student... that's not really in the cards right now. Can anyone help me find Pinus Sibrica seeds in Canada or the US?

    Any help or leads would be gratly appreciated!

    Thank you in advacne for you help!

    Great Forum!

    Joey
     
  16. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

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  17. Madawaska

    Madawaska Member

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    Hi,

    Thanks again to Tree Nut for pointing out a seed source for Pinus Sibirica. I also found some on ebay (Seller: cblp0k - Search for: Siberian Pine Nut). I ordered a small amount and they are of very high quality. Have not tested them yet, but will post results. I plan on ordering a pound from Schumacher this fall.
     
  18. pjthedj

    pjthedj New Member

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    Re: Pinus Sibirica (sp?)

    Which vendors in Oregon? I am looking to grow this plant from seed to seedling. Love pine nuts!
     
  19. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Re: Pinus Sibirica (sp?)

    If you want to grow pine nuts in central Oregon, you'd probably do better to grow Pinus monophylla, it is better adapted to your climate ;-)
     
  20. pjthedj

    pjthedj New Member

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    Thank you for that insight. I will look into it.
     
  21. sgbotsford

    sgbotsford Active Member

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    Sheffield Seed in New York is a good supplier of tree seed. They said no problem shipping to Canada.
     
  22. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thanks for that link. I've added it to our Gymnosperm Resources page, and I invited you to submit information for your company, which you have done, so that is included on that page as well.
     
  23. Crazy plant lady 14

    Crazy plant lady 14 New Member

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    I just ordered 2 pinus siberica cones for seeds from ecominded.net :) Also read and loved the Ringing Cedars series Kate!
     

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