Pinus Parviflora 'Yatsabusa' aka Japanese white pine 'Yatsabusa'

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by leafclimber, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. leafclimber

    leafclimber Member

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    I just bought this small pine tree over the weekend and was looking for more information. I searched the web and didn't fnd out too much. Sounds like this is a dwarf or semi-dwarf variety. As tempting as it is to grow it as a bonsai I am planning on planting it in the ground. My primary questions are as follows:

    * Is this the same as 'Dwarf Yatsabusa'?
    * What is its ultimate height?
    * What kind of growth rate should I expect from this tree?
    * How drought tolerant are Japanese white pines? I will baby it during the first few years.
    * Any special planting requirements besides good drainage and full sun?

    Any information would be appreciated. Also can anyone recommend a good book on pines? Something similar to Vertrees book on Japanese maples. Thanks!
     
  2. Laurie

    Laurie Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    The correct spelling is probably 'Yatsubusa'. Greer Gardens lists its growth rate at 6" - 12" per year. Oregon State lists the growth rate of 'Pygmy Yatsubusa' at about 5 cm per year, so they are likely different. Sunset Western Garden Book lists P. parviflora as slow to moderate growth, 20' to 50' or more. Furthermore they state that it grows well in Seattle, so can one take that to mean that it is resistant to white pine blister rust, or is that only a problem in the woods where Ribes sanguineum grows? Cultural requirements for the cultivar are probably the same as for the species. SWGB: "Most of the species with five needles to a bundle need watering." Are members in agreement or does this appy to Califormia? I only water our P. wallichiana just a little every once in a while. We have added P. koraiensis to the collection, but it has not yet been planted out. Water these pines regularly the first year, as needed thereafter?
     
  3. leafclimber

    leafclimber Member

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    Re: Pinus Parviflora 'Yatsubusa' aka Japanese white pine 'Yatsubusa'

    Thanks for the reply and info. I have seen the spelling both ways but I agree that the correct spelling appears to be Yatsubusa. Tried to edit the title of my original post but it didn't look like I could so I updated the title for this post. After more web searches with the correct name I was able to find out more.

    http://www.contrarymarysplants.com/dwarf_conifers.htm
    Pinus parviflora Yatsubusa, classification: Dwarf (grows 1-6 per year and 1-6 in 10-15 years). A dwarf pine with shorter internodes giving it a very full appearanceneedles are bluish and smaller than the species.

    http://www.stanleyandsons.com/productdisplay.cfm?product=PIN 3480
    * A dwarf form of Japanese White Pine. Plant grows very compact with shorter internodes than species. Needles are blue and green and are slightly smaller than species. Plant has a full look rather than shaggy pine. 10 year: 8' X 5'

    http://www.bluesterling.com/Pinus.htm
    * 'YATSUBUSA A nice dwarf with short needles and numerous buds. It has a good congested and dense growing habit. Very popular for bonsai also. 6-12" per year

    I suppose its growth is highly dependent on the soil fertility, moisture, and exposure. Still curious about the final size of this tree. I want to make sure that I give it enough space. I took a few pictures yesterday so I'll try to post them soon.
     
  4. leafclimber

    leafclimber Member

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    Finally, here are some pictures. If anyone knows how big this tree will get please let me know. I'll also gladly accept pruning tips as this is my first pine, other than the ubiquitous mugo pine. The next pine I plan to purchase will be a Shore Pine (pinus contorta var. contorta). Thanks!
     

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  5. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Well there never is an absolute ultimate size, as a tree will always keep growing unless it dies. That's a very cute little specimen there. My understanding is that pines only produce new shoots once per year, and so you can make a pretty good estimate of annual growth by looking at how long the year's shoots are.

    Adrian Bloom's book "Gardening with conifers" gives a pretty good overview of all the conifers, focussing on the smaller varieties and cultivariants, but addresses the needs and behaviour of the species as well.
     
  6. leafclimber

    leafclimber Member

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    I reserved the book that you recommended at the library along with a few others including one on pruning conifers. Thanks for the suggestion.

    As far as size for this tree I understand what you are saying. It will keep growing until it dies, though as the plant matures the growth rate slows down alot. I get frustrated by the size listing that most nursery plants have on their tags. Most seem to list the 10 year height which is useful to get a sense for the growth rate, but it doesn't tell you whether the tree will ultimately become 15' or 100'. For common plants there is enough history about growth habit to know how large it will be, but for newer strains and cultivars you never can be sure.

    All that said it is a compact grower and it has short needles so I expect it not to grow too fast. I'll put this question to rest!
     
  7. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    It is difficult to accurately describe "mature" size for many conifers, especially the rarer cultivars. And the same plant, in different locations, can grow very differently. Nurseries can only try to pinpoint growth rate for the customer-even those may be completely wrong if the plant is particularly happy (or unhappy) in its planting spot. I know how frustrating this is as one of my jobs over the last 10 years has been writing descriptions for nursery plants. I have personnally seen 2 conifers, propagated at the same time, planted in 2 different locations (my house, and the display gardens at work, 17 miles apart) grow very differently; my plant is 1/2 the size of the one at work, and much tighter in habit. It is both nature and nurture that determines the mature size of the plant. Luckily for you, pines are very easy to prune for size control.
     

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