Part-plant bottles from Coca-Cola company...?

Discussion in 'Plants: In the News' started by Hartley Botanic, Jan 25, 2010.

  1. Hartley Botanic

    Hartley Botanic Active Member

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    Just stumbled upon this on Google!

    Coca-Cola Co., the world’s largest drink maker, is jumping on the eco-bandwagon with the "plantbottle", a plastic bottle alternative made partly from plants.

    The new plant-based bottle developed by Coke is composed of 70% petroleum-based and 30% sugar-cane-based materials. The cane is crushed and mashed to produce juice, which is then fermented and distilled, producing ethanol. That ethanol is then converted through a series of chemical processes such as oxidation to a mono-ethylene glycol—a component normally derived from petroleum for use in plastic bottles. The MEG is then mixed with terephthalic acid to create PET plastic.


    Interesting. What does everyone think?
     
  2. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

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    It's a start! At least someone is thinking....barb
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Mixed feelings about this sort of thing. Bottles - or vehicle fuel, etc. - made from plants means more land needed to cultivate the plants, which equates directly to less land available for biodiversity and wildlife.
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    I'm with Michael on this one, especially as I live in a cane-exporting country. I know for a fact that they could be using the bagasse (waste cane after crushing) for the same purpose, but the process is a couple of cents more expensive per bottle so they don't.
     
  5. Hartley Botanic

    Hartley Botanic Active Member

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    I'm torn. I think on the surface it seems like a great idea, but then when given some time to sink in, seems limore like a big 'green' gesture, with the nattily written press release and eveything.

    When you consider all the processes needed to create this new bottle, you have to wonder about the impacts of them. It states in the article that a third party has not yet verified whether this is even economically viable and as green as they claim. Just seems like over-complicating matters, doesn't it?!
     
  6. sarahatbernheim

    sarahatbernheim Active Member Maple Society

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    I have to agree with you michael. I'm mixed about this too. Something I picked up during my time at Bernheim arboretum was to look at the whole picture and not the end result. Although the end product may be better for the environment, how does the process of getting the product affect the environment. It's the same question with Electric power . . . the end result is great, but how do we get electricity and how does it effect the environment.

    Coca-cola's intentions are meant for the better, but look at the whole process.
     

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