Pac NW garden moths - and other moths

Discussion in 'Celebrate Biodiversity' started by Georgia Strait, Jul 7, 2020.

  1. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    Location:
    South Okanagan & Greater Vancouver, BC Canada
    July 10/20 - approx 8am PDT - Coast nr Vanc BC

    This photo is one resting moth that is approx 1 inch fr nose to end of tail

    It is an apricot color with distinct mark on each wing

    QUESTION - from what I understand in earlier posts above - the marks are built in to camouflage and/or look threatening, correct?

    I promised a small white moth resting nearby I would not ignore it (as in we (me!) are like human magpies wanting to see and have glitzy showy in garden flora fauna)
     

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  2. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    I agree and thank you for searching ID

    I see there is one similar in our area -

    Regardless of that - I appreciate your moth detective work for me.
     
  3. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Georgia Strait, Good evening Georgia, I'm afraid I cannot ID your moth ,but your question about markings and what they are for, I do know. It is purely camouflage to prevent predation during the day.
    Hope that clears that up for you.
     
  4. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    Yesterday was favorable to the sightings , in the evening it entered the house - and seemed to find it pleasant to be photographed - what would seem to be una Tyta luctuosa ((I would like confirmation or denial, thank you) una falena di circa un centimetro e mezzo.
    Tyta luctuosa.jpg Tyta  luctuosa (2).jpg

    In the early afternoon a diurnal moth of the Erebidae family, Euplagia quadripunctaria,
    was laid on the handle of an amphora in the shade, real quiet.
    Too bad it was wings closed and did not show the red color of the interior.

    Euplagia quadripunctata (3).jpg

    I don't think I can have many doubts about her: in the Petaloudes valley on the Greek island of Rhodes where every year, at the end of the rainy season (the end of May), butterflies cover the entire valley.


    For those unfamiliar with this particular place, I will link a video.
     
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  5. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Arlette, Good morning, your ID is spot on IMO. The 4 spots become evident when wings are open.
    You are so right about the Euplagia quadripunctaria, beautiful when the wings are spread.
    Lovely video, of something not enjoyed and viewed naturally in the UK, so thankyou for posting it.
    We are off walking now to enjoy some sunshine before the garden work beckons.
    Have a lovely Sunday.
     
  6. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    @Acerholic Have a nice walk and enjoy the sun !!! For the garden, today is Sunday and you should enjoy it comfortably, in an armchair, drinking a cold drink ................... or not?

    Sorry but I did not quite understand the fact that, being in a place to visit, the Valley of the batterflies is an unnatural and harmful place for butterflies.
    Butterflies are attracted by the sweet scent of resin but above all by the microclimate of the valley which is humid and fresh. I think that if they have this "mass stop" at that precise time in their let's call it "imprinting" it would certainly not stop respecting it and return regularly to the valley where the forest guards, moreover, strictly monitor the behavior of visitors.
    Their constant recommendation is to let these insects rest to prevent them from consuming too much energy and from failing to mate and lay their eggs between late August and early September.
    It is also forbidden to clap, whistle or run; I don't remember if the accesses were also limited.
    I can only imagine - and be horrified - what could happen if they were free but not somehow protected.
    To what massacre would they be destined, even just for cruel amusement, by visitors without control who would still be attracted by that phenomenon so unusual and spectacular
    But maybe I didn't quite understand the meaning of your sentence.
     
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  7. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Arlette, just back and now for a cool drink.
    My point was that sadly you just dont see this wonderful phenomenon in the UK.
    Hope that clears up the confusion. I should have explained it better.
     
  8. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    Sunday 12 July nr the ocean near Vanc BC

    Moth sleeping in rosemary shrub

    The distinct feature of this moth is the main body — it’s a fat curved caterpillar w wings

    The body length is approx 1.5 inch fr nose to tail (end of wing)

    Width with outstretched wings is approx 2.5 inches

    I don’t want to disturb it so these are best pix for now.

    Some sort of hawk moth?

    ÉDIT 721pm PDT - i think it’s a « one eyed Sphinx moth »
    One-eyed sphinx Smerinthus cerisyi Wm. Kirby, 1837 | Butterflies and Moths of North America
     

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    Last edited: Jul 12, 2020
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  9. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    Good morning! Could it be a Paonias excaecata?
     
  10. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Georgia Strait, Good morning Georgia, IMHO, it is the one eyed Sphinx moth. Well spotted and photographed!!
     
  11. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    Maybe because it was a cold night (it was preparing the strong storm of a half hour ago), maybe because he wanted some company, a moth entered the kitchen last night . At first glance looked like something of a sad black, then when she came to pose on the wall near me I realized that it was, yes, dark but beautiful with a very elaborate design.
    falena (4).jpg
    It should be a Parascotia fuliginaria but there are many different ones and I can't find it.
    Exact identification: Trachea atriplicis- Noctuidae
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2020

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