Owari Satsuma Mandarin

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by drichard12, Oct 28, 2005.

  1. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    When does the Owari Satsuma Mandarin ripen mine is changing color now
     
  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    According to Walheim's book, Citrus, Dec-Apr in Northern coastal California - the area closest in climate to that of Michigan of those listed.
     
  3. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Many times Satsuma's can be ripe even while the peel is still green. This happens often in Florida and other warm states. I ate a Owari Satsuma this morning from my tree. The fruit was only about half way turned yellow, yet it was fully mature. A lot depends on the temperatures the tree is growing in. If you have a quanitity of fruit on the tree, try one. Know that Satsuma's fruit usually do not obtain a very good quality, until the tree gets to about six or seven years of age. In the tropics, mandarins and oranges never turn orange, due to the high temperatures and humidity. In tropical countries, this makes it difficult to tell the "ripe" fruit from the "un-ripe" fruit. I put those two terms in "" marks because citrus really do not ripen, as in apples and pears. Citrus fruits mature. Junglekeeper, if you want to buy a really good book on citrus, purchase a copy of "Biology Of Citrus." Great book. Hundred times better then Walheim's book. However, Walheim's book makes a good picture book.- Millet
     
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Agreed - I just finished reading BoC for the second time. I think Walheim's book is good for someone wanting to select the best varieties for their particular area. It is afterall the main purpose of his book.
     
  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Testing something... Biology of Citrus

    Ok, that works. Amazon.com links now automatically add the referral for the garden. Unfortunately, it's not working yet for the Links Database.
     
  6. AnotherAlterEgo

    AnotherAlterEgo Active Member

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    Although these two books would be found in the same section of a library, assuming one would even be in an average library, it's not really fair to compare them. The first sentence in the preface of Biology of Citrus states: "The present book aims to provide a concise, up-to-date reference book on most aspects of citrus biology." Whereas the first chapter of Citrus is called "Gardener's Guide to Citrus," which would imply that this book is more for the neophyte. Walheim's book touches on everything of interest to the home grower. Whereas Biology goes into extreme detail. Most hobbyists have no interest in the discussion of synthetic auxins "(such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacteic acid)" (Biology, 105), nor would they even know what to do with such information. In my personal library, I have both books, along with many additional novice and scientific works -- including handwritten notes given to me by the likes of Sherwood Aiken and other 'oldtimers' in the field. Every book or compilation of notes in my library has value on its own merit. By the same token, I wouldn't compare The Great Citrus Book, which includes many closeup photos and brief histories -- along with recipes -- with The Compendium of Citrus Diseases. Quite simply, it's like comparing apples and oranges. No pun intended. With that, I hope my response finds you all well and I hope ya'll are succesfully preparing your gardens for what (I hope) is a long winter.
     
  7. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    I think both are good books but are clearly intended for different audiences and purposes. (They're now included in the Citrus links.)
     
  8. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    I found that Lance Walheim's book was a little to basic for me. One book that I do enjoy, was written by Willam Argo & Paul Fisher ( Understanding Ph Management for container Grown Crops)

    If I recall correctly I believe all the 8 Chapters can be found on the web in Pdf formats
     
  9. Laaz

    Laaz Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi Dale to answer your question. Most Owari's ripen from late Oct. - Mid Dec. In my area they are best about Thanksgiving.
     
  10. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    Well I picked my first Satsuma Mandarin. It was very juicy but not to sweet Maybe with age it will become better
     
  11. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Dale, exactly, every year will be better and better. - Millet
     
  12. AnotherAlterEgo

    AnotherAlterEgo Active Member

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    Dale - Was this the same Satsuma tree of which you posted a photo (in another forum) several months ago? If so, congratulations to you on your gardening skills. That tree certainly came a long way in one season, with you as its caretaker. I hope all is well with you.
     
  13. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    Yes it's the same tree, The canopy really took off this summer. I think having the hobby greenhouse was a big factor in all my tree's, I'm hoping to have tree's like Benny someday. His photos are a BIG inspiration. along with all the grateful people willing to help novices like myself
     
  14. AnotherAlterEgo

    AnotherAlterEgo Active Member

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    Dale - Congratulations! Keep in mind that Benny is in California. If you have trees like that in Michigan, I'll be the first in line to buy your book on citriculture! You are well on your way, though, and an inspiration to us all (even down here in Texas). Take care, my friend.
     
  15. Howdy y'all from Savannah GA. Wonder if you can help I have a satsuma madarin that was budded July 2001. It is now about 4 foot tall. In its growth it is more like a bush than tree. It produces 12-15 at this year from various branches. My question is should I prune out to one or two "trunks" or leave it as is?

    Thanks
     
  16. Laaz

    Laaz Active Member 10 Years

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    Madarin tree's are small to begin with. If it was budded onto Flying Dragon it will not reach much more than 6 ft at maturity. In a cooler area like yours letting the branches hang down near the ground helps with cold protection. Have a look at commercial Mandarin tree.

    http://ccpp.ucr.edu/variety/images/vi033t.jpg
     
  17. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    If one wants a standard shaped tree, rather than a bush tree, it is best to prune out unwanted trunks starting on day one. You can prune now, but it will greatly set the tree back, and greatly reduce or stop fruiting. I agree with Lazz and leave it alone. However it is up to you. - Millet
     
  18. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    I also agree with Laaz an Millet, I'd leave it alone Dale
     

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