Over Fertilizing

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Cirrus57, Jul 31, 2005.

  1. Cirrus57

    Cirrus57 Member

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    What would the visible effects on a Maple (Inaba Shidare) that has been over fertilized ? I transplanted it in June and have been giving it 15-30-15 soluble once a week . The leaves that are starting to come out at the top seem very small and burn easily . The lower leaves came in the lower part of the tree are healthier and larger and are not getting sunburnt . Would overwatering cause this ??
     
  2. Layne Uyeno

    Layne Uyeno Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi,

    It's not from over fertilizing. Some cultivars it seems put out tiny leaves along with normal sized leaves. These tinier leaves will burn in the summer heat. I have a Tamahime and a Shindeshojo that put out tiny leaves and normal leaves and in most cases the smaller leaves burn during the summer. However, 15-30-15 once a week for a plant that is in the ground is overdoing it especially if you're applying it according to the package directions. If you are diluting it a 1/4 strength then that frequency should be fine.

    Layne
     
  3. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I second Layne. The small or even tiny summer leaves that burn shortly after they emerge seem to be a normal occurrance on many maples in the summer. I see these most on chutes that are growing in length, so terminal chutes. I suspect that the energy need to lengthen the chute of the plant causes a deficit in the energy available to produce leaves. In the summer the plant cannot compensate due to increased demands caused by heat. Usually the chutes stay healthy and we get an overall increase in size, but we have to wait unitil next year for the correct leaf form. This is more common on red leaved varieties. This is in contrast to what happens when we see replacement buds break on existing chutes to replace bruned leaves. These are often larger and more atypical than normal leaves. Dissectums also seem to throw larger atypical leaves on new and existing chutes where it is the palmatum and amoenum group of trees that seems to show the symptoms you mention more often.

    It is certainly possilble that water practices or fungal disease is involoved, but it seems to be a regular occurrance.

    Lastly, quit fertilizing so much. You are asking for trouble if you keep that up and I can't believe you haven't run into trouble yet. 1/4 strength every week or even two weeks would be more than enough. The natural form of the tree will be more pleasing in the long run than the form you will get forced by the fertilizer. You risk heavy root damage if you contiune the current program.

    MJH
     
  4. Cirrus57

    Cirrus57 Member

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    Thanks for the advice MJH and Layne . I will definitely slow down the watering and won't fertilize until the fall .
     
  5. Layne Uyeno

    Layne Uyeno Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi,

    How often are you watering?

    Layne
     
  6. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Here are a few photos showing the effects of over fertilization due to a root stimulator I was using. Couple this with temperatures over 100 and the photos speak to the results.

    These photos depict a situation that we really don't need to worry about because it is early in the season and you can already see the new buds swelling and even breaking. When this sort of instant crispy state is followed by blackened petioles and twigs, then we need to worry! Cooked leaves that immediately fall from the tree are no big deal and are commonplace around here, fertilizer or not.

    MJH
     

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  7. Cirrus57

    Cirrus57 Member

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    I was watering it every day . Since I didnt use a transplant hormone I thought the extra fertilizer and water would help it . It seems to be pretty healthy overall . I have stopped watering and fertilizing it until I see signs of distress . Someone else mentioned summer dormancy . I can see new signs of growth on the top but its not doing much . I will try to get a picture posted . Thanks for the pics MJH .
     
  8. Layne Uyeno

    Layne Uyeno Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi,

    Even for a new transplant in the ground every day watering is too much. The signs of overwatering take longer to manifest themselves as the roots slowly start to rot, whereas signs of underwatering can show in a day.

    Stop the fertilizer, but don't stop the watering until you "see signs of distress". Just lower the frequency of the waterings. Regular deep waterings for maples in the ground is better than short waterings every day. Depending on the season's temps you'll need to water once a week, or twice a week, or maybe even three times a week if it's very hot. In the winter where you are you don't need to water at all.

    It would be good to see pics of the tree when you can post them.

    Layne
     

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