Appreciation: Out and About

Discussion in 'How's It Growing?' started by wcutler, May 24, 2020.

  1. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @wcutler and doesn't that look better Wendy. The days of short bowling green style lawns must surely be over. I really hope so.
     
  2. Margot

    Margot Contributor

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    Your photos definitely support the theme of beauty after death.[​IMG]

    This beautiful Arbutus stump must be 50 years old, taken down we think when the house was built. It is disintegrating badly now but at one time, it measured at least 3 feet across. I love it and will be sad when it finally collapses.
     

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  3. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Margot, I agree Margot, but enjoy their beauty whilst you can. Lovely photo btw.
     
  4. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Today I thought I would lean towards the romantics on the forum. It has a sad twist I'm afraid though.
    This is our visit to National Trust Claremont in Surrey England. It is very very close to a busy road, but it is so tranquil and calming. Even the visitors seem to understand that this is a special place not to be disturbed by noise.
    The obligatory Cedar is there of course as always in my photos. And every special place has to have a grotto.

    I hope you can enlarge photo 5 ( jpg4 ) it was taken in some rain, but this tells of a true love story of a Princess and her consort, that tugs at the heart strings when you read it.
    The photos I took, hopefully make more sense after reading.
     

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  5. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    To enlarge the photo enough to read more easily, after you click it, you can click the slanted arrow at the upper right to open it in a new window, then click on the picture there (the cursor will change to a magnifier).
     
  6. Margot

    Margot Contributor

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  7. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Margot, so pleased you were able to understand more of Claremont in your readings. The postings I'm putting on 'out and about' I hope show how gardens can bring a little of history to life.
    Glad you enjoyed this Margot, even though it is a sad end to a love story.
     
  8. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I don't remember if I've linked to Douglas Justice's August 2020 In the Neighbourhood - UBC Botanical Garden; it's had its first update already. The Hibiscus syriacus is one plant featured, with a photo that is similar in colour to the one I posted earlier, but the one at this boulevard planting is less double. Douglas didn't give it a cultivar name.
    Hibiscus-syriacus_HarwoodCardero_Cutler_20200811_142053.jpg Hibiscus-syriacus_HarwoodCardero_Cutler_20200811_142058.jpg Hibiscus-syriacus_HarwoodCardero_Cutler_20200811_142115.jpg

    Also featured is Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue'. I think the salvia here is that cultivar, looks quite nice with the Hesperantha coccinea. There is a Botany Photo of the Day on the Hesperantha: Hesperantha coccinea.
    BoulevardPlanting_HarwoodCardero_Cutler_20200811_142221.jpg Hesperantha-coccinea-Salvia-guaraniticaBlack-and-Blue_HarwoodCardero_Cutler_20200811_142141.jpg Hesperantha-coccinea-Salvia-guaraniticaBlack-and-Blue_HarwoodCardero_Cutler_20200811_142205.jpg

    On the building's property just across from this planting are three colours of Mirabilis jalapa - only the red ones were opening for me appropriately at Four O'Clock. [Edited - I see in the photo name that it was 5:00; maybe I missed the big show.]
    Mirabilis-jalapa_HarwoodCardero_Cutler_20200813_165659.jpg Mirabilis-jalapa_HarwoodCardero_Cutler_20200813_165735.jpg
     
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  9. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @wcutler, good morning Wendy, those fiery August reds are needed now as gardens start to look a little tired. These photos will help us all through Winter upon returning to them on the dark cold days to come.
     
  10. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good morning, I thought today I would return to sculptured trees and hedges. There are none more impressive than at Blickling hall in Norfolk England we visited.
    This is a Jacobean mansion and gardens with the Yew hedge that leads to you to the front door planted in the mid 16th century and still growing well. The topiary is very impressive.
    Once again the Boleyn name crops up with Anne being born here in 1507. I like to imagine the family playing Croquet on the lawn, dressed in their finest 16th century clothes. Quite a strange feeling though walking around here, knowing now what happened to poor Anne and how the family fell from grace.
    I have attached the link as I'm aware a few like to read about the history.
    Blickling Hall - Wikipedia

    No Cedars today, as this was not the theme I was aiming at.
     

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  11. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I'm still working on Douglas Justice's August 2020 In the Neighbourhood - UBC Botanical Garden. One of the featured plants this week is Verbena bonariensis (purple-top or tall verbena), which I didn't know at all, though I've been seeing it around, was calling it something else, then realized the stems didn't match at all so was at a loss. And there it was in the blog, so I was off to the Stanley Park Rose Garden to find a match.
    Verbena-bonariensis_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135756.jpg Verbena-bonariensis_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_140032.jpg Verbena-bonariensis_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_140244.jpg Verbena-bonariensis_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_140256.jpg Verbena-bonariensis_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_141812.jpg

    I'm sorry I didn't think to photograph the leaves until the end, and then my photo is so bad - I'm posting it only to show how skinny the leaves are - different from the ones on Lantana [corrected: Heliotrope]. And I didn't remember at all to notice how they feel like shark's skin. How does @Douglas Justice even know that?
    Verbena-bonariensis_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_142855.jpg

    I think this is Lantana montevidensis [edited, it's Heliotrope], which is growing in the same areas as the verbena.
    Lantana-montevidensis_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135927.jpg Lantana-montevidensis_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135937.jpg

    Since I'm doing purple, here is Cynara cardunculus.
    Cynara-cardunculus_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_143123.jpg Cynara-cardunculus_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_142427.jpg

    And since I was in the rose garden, here is a purple rose, called Rosa 'Rhapsody in Blue'.
    RosaRhapsodyInBlue_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135335.jpg RosaRhapsodyInBlue_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135340.jpg RosaRhapsodyInBlue_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135402.jpg
    and one not purple - Rosa 'Easy Does It'.
    RosaEasyDoesIt_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135237.jpg RosaEasyDoesIt_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135242.jpg RosaEasyDoesIt_StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_135307.jpg

    It's still a riot of colour over there.
    StanleyParkRoseGarden_Cutler_20200814_140421.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2020
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  12. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @wcutler, a riot of colour sounds wonderful Wendy. Looking at your very last photo, the straw like appearance gives evidence of very little rain in the gardens. Do they carry out watering in the beds, or are they left to fend for themselves?
     
  13. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good morning, this is of our visit to Oxburgh Hall in Norfolk England. My main aim was to try and get photos of the Knot garden from the rooftop. As I think this is where the 16th century occupants would have had the best view. I was u able to get all of it, but I hope my photo gi es the general idea.
    Of course from me the Cedars have to be photographed. I do like the Fir and Cedar together at this location.
    For anybody wishing to read a little more about this place I have attached a link.
    Oxburgh Hall - Wikipedia
    The trees that frame the entrance although not leafed out do show how the garden planners of the day new exactly how to place trees for optimum effect to draw your eyes to where they wanted you to look.
    The lawns around the hall are kept immaculate to once again draw your eyes up toward the house. These were residents that wanted you to know they were wealthy and powerful.
    The contortions of a tree that is more than likely not going to be part of the landscape in the very near future is my final photo, to show that nothing lasts forever.
     

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  14. Margot

    Margot Contributor

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    I'm so impressed that the same family has managed to occupy this house for over 500 years! That's just amazing.

    My family owned a wonderful house that my parents built for 50 years - and that was quite an accomplishment compared to most families' homes.
     
  15. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Margot, yes I agree, but so many are now in National Trust hands as they cannot be maintained properly by the families. That is a bonus for us average people, who can visit and enjoy the wonderful gardens and landscapes, that in years gone by would never of been able to do.

    So nice you have such wonderful memories of a happy home at your parents house. As you say 50 years is an achievement when in these days of moving to chase jobs etc, people don't seem to have the same connection to a house or a community that they used to have.
     
  16. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    They water the beds, and there must be watering on the grass too. I thought it looked pretty green!
     
  17. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The one plant is heliotrope rather than lantana.

    Her and an estimated 15,999 other souls.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 15, 2020
  18. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thank you! I have noted the correction. Heliotropum is not even in the same family - Boriginaceae; Verbena is Lamiaceae.

    A cultivar of Heliotropium amplexicaule? Leaves are alternate, and flowers are in a spike, which now explains what I'm seeing in my second photo.
     
  19. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    If you get a chance to go back, smell that heliotrope ... should smell something like talcum powder.
     
  20. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Today I thought I would show a more formal garden of clipped Box and Yews. The interesting but sad thing when we visited Ickworth house in Suffolk England, was that all the Box was gradually being ripped out due to blight. In two of my photos, you will see pots of Yew ligned up ready to take the place of the beautiful manicured Box.
    There were many Cedars at Ickworth that blended beautifully with everything planted close by. That really drew my interest.
    The topiary and hedge clipping was second to none IMO and that includes all the grandest houses we have visited.
    I have attached a link to this very different grand house, with it's internal curved doors to accommodate the circular structure.
    Ickworth House - Wikipedia
    Hope you enjoy this little look at these wonderful gardens.
     

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  21. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    No photos today, but I thought I would share a conversation over the phone with my daughter yesterday.
    She has decided to start rock climbing as her Netball has stopped due to Covid. A nice pastime she can do with her husband.
    Any way she informed me that there were some interesting plants in crevices whilst she was climbing. I asked "did you take any photos for me"?
    Her reply was "Dad, so you expect me to take my hands off my only grip and take photos for you for your forum" ?
    I then realised what I had said and sheepishly said "Sorry".
    It is so easy to get wound up in your own hobby, forgetting even about the safety of a loved daughter!!!
    I think a bunch of flowers is going her way today.
     
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  22. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Here is a hydrangea I like, a pair on either side of residential building entrance. It is not the one featured in Douglas Justice's August 2020 In the Neighbourhood - UBC Botanical Garden, which was H. arborescens. I got some help here - Douglas noted to me in an email
    This is Hydrangea paniculata—probably 'Smhplqf' (marketed under Little Quick Fire® and often listed merely as Quick Fire). Note the elongated, paniculate inflorescence and the smallish leaves (and note the whorls of three leaves at some of the nodes, which is very common in H. paniculata). Hydrangea arborescens has a corymbose, often very broad inflorescence, much floppier stems and broader, lighter coloured, floppier leaves.​
    I like that there are fertile flowers, not clearly demarcated as on other species. I think in the last photo the stem at the upper right shows a whorl of leaves.
    Hydrangea-paniculata_950Gilford_Cutler_20200816_175758.jpg Hydrangea-paniculata_950Gilford_Cutler_20200816_175810.jpg Hydrangea-paniculata_950Gilford_Cutler_20200816_175833.jpg Hydrangea-paniculata_950Gilford_Cutler_20200816_175848.jpg
     
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  23. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Back to the Stanley Park Rose Garden, and I was going to try to fly that Lantana montevidensis name again, as what is growing right next to the Heliotrope, but maybe it's Lantana camara. I'm getting too confused by what I'm seeing on the internet, can't tell if the purple ones are called L. camara or not. The first photo shows Lantana on the left, Heliotrope on the right, next to each other - it's pretty easy to see which is which. The fourth photo, from the same bed, looks like what I'm seeing as Lantana camara, of which there are many cultivars.
    Lantana-Heliotrope_StanleyPark_RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_151812.jpg Lantana-montevidensis_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_150419.jpg Lantana-montevidensis_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_151218.jpg Lantana-camara_StanleyPark_RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_151140.jpg

    Well, something was quite fragrant, but I was standing in front of the Lantana when I noticed it the most! That's used in perfumes, so that's pretty reasonable.
    Here is the Heliotrope again; this week I am trying out the name Heliotropum arborescens, though I would expect that to be more, you know, arborescent.
    Heliotrope_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_150748.jpg Heliotrope_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_150853.jpg Heliotrope_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_150903.jpg Heliotrope_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_150916.jpg

    I tried again to get a photo of the leaves Verbena bonariensis, only slightly more successfully, and again I forgot to feel for the sharkskin. That's gardener Frankie again in the second photo. I should try her on the species names, but I had so many questions.
    Verbena-bonariensis_StanleyPark_RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_151051.jpg Verbena bonariensis_StanleyPark_RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_150246.jpg Verbena bonariensis_StanleyPark_RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_153559.jpg

    This area is still very colourful, lots of dahlias, and zinnias. The light yellow flowers are Zinnia 'Green Envy'.
    Dahlias_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_150312.jpg Dahlias_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_151600.jpg ZinniaGreenEnvy_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_152104.jpg ZinniaGreenEnvy_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_152111.jpg

    Today's rose is Rosa 'Lady Elise May', a shrub rose.
    RosaLadyEliseMay_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_153153.jpg RosaLadyEliseMay_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_153225.jpg RosaLadyEliseMay_StanleyPark-RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_153313.jpg
     
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  24. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Here are two landscape shots. The first is looking down on the area in front of the Stanley Park Pavilion. Maybe the folks in the second photo, in the lower Rose Garden, will be making their way over there.
    StanleyPark-Pavilion_Cutler_20200818_152355.jpg StanleyPark_RoseGarden_Cutler_20200818_153943.jpg
     
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  25. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @wcutler on a very Autumnal feeling day in England, with nowhere to visit safely, your photos have cheered us up Wendy. Particularly loved the pavillion shots. I do love trees !!
     

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