Identification: Orange growths

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by allelopath, Mar 31, 2006.

  1. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Orange growths approximately 0.5 cm in diameter.
    Growing on a tree branch lying in snow in a coniferous forest in northern New Mexico, USA.

    Can anybody id this?
     

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2006
  2. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

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    Not great with fungi, but as a guess Dacromyces species, common name Fairy Butter? Harry
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Thanks for the reply. It doesn't really match, however, what i think of (or have seen around here) as Dacromyces. Not jelly like enough.
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    I know Dacromyces palmatus and Tremella mesenterica (both are commonly referred to as Witche's butter) pretty well, and I don't think that is what you have.

    I'm sorry to say that although I can tell you what it is not, I cannot tell you what it is.

    Is your organism hard or soft?
     
  5. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    If I recall correctly, it was somewhat hard.
    It gives a little if you push on it, but not much.
     
  6. Mycos

    Mycos Active Member

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    I looked for quite sometime under the Discomycetes (which I'm fairly certain it should be) but unfortunately this was about the closest I could come to it. <http://tinyurl.com/h7zg2>.

    I realize that the "Cup Fungi" encompasses a huge number of species, most of which cannot be keyed out without a micoscope, so I haven't really narrowed things down much for you. But if you have the time to start looking through web photo's, I think you'd do well to start in [Discomycetes, perhaps Helotiales]

    This looked like one of the better jumping off points for you. http://tinyurl.com/kxt38
     
  7. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    well, i've looked around a little, haven't found anything.
    I'll keep looking.

    Also, thanks for tinyurl.com.
    Its new to me.
     
  8. Mycos

    Mycos Active Member

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    No problem.

    I asked Brian Spooner of Kew Gardens what he thought it might be, and he replied:

    So, given his obvious expertise in such matters, I'll have to defer to his opinion in this matter. If you find a good match, let us know, OK? Hope this helps to get you a little closer.
     
  9. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I have not thought about this much until yesterday. I have come across the species again, in a different setting and time. The first time, it was late March, with snow on the ground, and I think it was on a ponderosa. Now its August, by a stream (nearly in it) on a soggy dead branch which is probably spruce.
     

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