Opposite leaved wildflower, and 1 grass with hard caryopsis

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Eyerah, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. Eyerah

    Eyerah Active Member

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    Before I ask about the plants, I just want to say thanks to everyone who uses this forum. As a novice field botanist, this site has been a great tool for me when I get stumped in the keys. Also, when I find a single plant that I don't know, I know that I can photograph it and post it here instead of picking it and killing a potentially rare plant.

    Thank You!

    Today I came across a single stem of this beautiful little wildflower on a rocky shore of an island on lake of the woods (NW Ontario, E Manitoba, or N. Minnesota take your pick :)). I have been surveying up here for a few weeks now, and haven't come across this plant yet, maybe it is rare. Even if not, it is the only occurrence on one of our sites, so I didn't want to pick it just to key it, and I couldn't key it in the field.

    The other plant that I need to key it this one. A simple grass, looks like it could be an annual. Broad flat leaves, hairy collar and a ligule of hairs ~2-3 mm. Lemmas are glabrous. I have a specimen of it, but I can't seem to key it. Please let me know if there is any other features on it that I need to describe.

    Thanks so much!
     

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  2. David in L A

    David in L A Active Member 10 Years

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    Collomia?
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    That's what I thought also.
     
  4. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Keying grasses needs a microscope to see the flower details. I believe this is Panicum and it has a rather confusing spikelet structure with reduced florets looking as additional glumes/lemmas. The lemma of the fertile floret wraps around the palea and seed. It is shiny and so smooth that it is practically impossible to handle it with a pincette.
     
  5. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Only Collomia linearis goes that far east.
     
  6. Eyerah

    Eyerah Active Member

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    Thanks everyone! I just ran our and took another look, and it fits the description in Chadde very well. I peeked inside a persistent calyx and saw what looked like a 3 sided capsule. I think that it is a good ID.

    Now for the grass. I am having some trouble with the keys in Chadde's Minnesota Flora. I am also using Voss' Field Manual of Michigan Flora. Voss has better keys, but not much in the way of descriptions.

    Can anyone recommend a really user friendly grass key for the area??

    Cheers!
     
  7. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  8. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    You may want to pick up E.H. Moss' Flora of Alberta.
     
  9. Eyerah

    Eyerah Active Member

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    Thanks. I usually use Moss when I am working on the prairies. For some silly reason I didn't bring a copy on this trip.

    Thanks for the link to the digital keys, I will try these.
     
  10. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    Moss is equally good for all habitats, needless to say. There's a key provided for every family/group of species, as one would expect in a comprehensive work. :-)
     

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