odds of shin deshojo and katsura in zone 5??

Discussion in 'Maples' started by STi, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. kaydye

    kaydye Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    Live in Mapleton, Illinois, zone 5
    Brian,
    I am so glad that you "ran on " with that great information. I would love to have a database with reports on palmatums in zone 5. I have starred the maples that we both have in my little diary. Now I have some more to try. I just planted a seriyu about a month ago and all of them at the nursery had tip dieback. I wondered about it, but the rest of the tree looked great. That answers that question. But at least it will hopefully make it through. I also got a Beni Kawa (new graft) on the recommendation of Byles that it is hardier than Sango Kaku, of which two have not make it. One held on for about 3 years.

    Maybe some more zone 5'ers will tune in. I am like you also, my area is sheltered and receives no harsh winter winds. Sort of have a valley surrounded by woods. I get away with some because of that, I think. My temps get as low, also. My problem is having enough snow cover. We don't usually have much therefore winter dryness can be a problem.
    Kay
     
  2. Daniel Otis

    Daniel Otis Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    Ithaca, NY
    Sounds like our environmental circumstances are similar. Let me mention that I agree with Frank Byles that Beni Kawa is a bit tougher than Sango Kaku. In my experience, the red-bark maples, both snakebarks and palmatums, are not very sturdy--the sort of plant that you wheel out for a month or two every year during their brief lives, and then wheel out behind the barn for the parts of the year when they look horrible. I suspect that they need full protection from winter sun (which probably reduces the intensity of color), and probably a zone or two more warmth than they get here. The ones I've seen in England looked fantastic. For me, I think growing in pots is best, but then they are in my cold dark basement during their periods of glory, alas.
     
  3. Moose

    Moose Member

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    Location:
    Owen Sound, Ontario
    There is a Katsura tree in zone 5b (Owen Sound Ontario) in the local conservation authority arboretum. It is in a relatively sheltered area but seems to be thriving.
     
  4. STi

    STi Active Member

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    great info!! i plan on grabbing a few more off that list!

    i put them in 1 gallon pots with 3 part fir bark and 1 part cactus soil and half part aquarium gravel...hope that works ok
     
  5. kaydye

    kaydye Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    Live in Mapleton, Illinois, zone 5
    Dan,
    I want to apologize for calling you Brian in one of the posts. REading too fast, I guess. Sorry.
    Kay Dye
     
  6. kaydye

    kaydye Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    Live in Mapleton, Illinois, zone 5
    On another note...
    I stopped by the nursery in our area which is being brave enough to stock palmatums and they are almost sold out. When I was nosing around the lady asked me if I was lookin g for ***. maples (Hmmmm she recognized me? Not good! HA) and she said they were getting ready to send in an order. I wonder what will come and when. I wonder how they determine which ones to order. One thing bothers me though, we had a really bad drought last year and because of that this nursery has changed its return policy from 1 year (2 years if you are a garden rewards member)to 90 days for shrubs and trees. So if I buy any, I'll have to be sure to do my research because they do tend to play "fast and loose" sometimes with plants and zones (mophead hydrangeas that bloom on old wood, zone 6-7 hollies, etc.). Their prices are pretty good, though. It's the only way for me to get a 4' maple vs. a new graft.
     
  7. Maple_Lady

    Maple_Lady Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    La Center, WA USA
    Kay,

    Thanks for the link to this thread. It has been fascinating reading about all the maple lovers on the eastcoast and the climates they can survive in. I intend to add more information to my website about hardiness after reading these notes. Another member, Galt, told me that he is more worried about the hot summer weather than colder winters. Hot summer weather seem to be an issue also.

    My two sisters live in Sacramento, Ca and summers can be over 100 degrees for more than 30 days in a row. They have had some success with the maples I have provided but both lost Red Dragons which I will now replace.

    I just shipped a Peaches and Cream to a man in Arizona. I plan to keep in touch and see how it does. So any thoughts or comments about hot climates would also be appreciated. Thanks, Sam
     
  8. Frank Byles

    Frank Byles Member Maple Society

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    Location:
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    Dear Kay thank you for your kind words. I am now getting ready to work on my collection. Only have about 40 more cultivars to have all of "A" index of Vertrees book. Regarding A.p.'Shin de shojo' and 'Katsura' please plant the first in partial shade preferably under an overstory tree and the second where it will get full morning sun with at least partial shade in the afternoon. This applies almost anywhere in our blessed USA. I am still doing a bit of consulting and pruning to fill out my collecting. I now have a bit of time to fiddle with this great time consuming tube. Cheers to all. Frank Byles
     
  9. Frank Byles

    Frank Byles Member Maple Society

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    Location:
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    Laurie
    There are many cultivars suitable for zone five but just use some common sense and a bit of protection. Wind is more of a hazard than cold or heat. Most importantly, DO NOT over water Japanese maples - damp not wet. There are only a few maples that like wet feet like Acer rubrum. Use finger test to tell when to water ie; push finger into soil till it is dry down at least two joints or use the Lord's way, just plant a colorful pansy nearby and when it wilts it is time to water. Overwatering causes decreased root activity and even root rot. You should always be able to dig a small hole down beside your trees and see white roots with the brown ones. If the roots are not growing they will not send sap to the leaf tips and you will have at least dry crispy leaf tips for most of your summer that is if the whole tree does not dry up and blow away. Cheers.
    Frank
     
  10. Maple_Lady

    Maple_Lady Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    La Center, WA USA
    Frank Byles,

    You are an icon in our book of maple enthusiasts. I am a newby on the web with my small, but nice collection of maples available through my website. So are you out of the retail business and into the more enjoyable retired maple officionado?

    I am just north of Portland or about 100 miles from Olympia and I discussing our passion would be a priviledge. Let me know what you think of my offerings at this point. I am a one woman operation. My husband builds the greenhouses and I do the rest. When what I do becomes a job I will quit. Until then, I pot and stake until dark like tonight. Sam www.eastforknursery.com
     

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