Nyssa Sylvatica 'Autumn Cascade' question

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by willis_mckenna, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. willis_mckenna

    willis_mckenna Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lombard, IL Z5 USA
    My first post here. Woohoo!

    Does anybody have pics of decent sized ones? I just got one in the mail the other day and I think I need to prune off some side limbs and train a leader, but just curious if anybody has one and what their experiences are with it (Kneevin?). It will be planted in an area of my yard that gets standing water (a low spot for about 1 acre) for up to 2-3 days with heavy rains or snow-melt. I will plant it high to keep the graft union out of standing water, but otherwise these moisture conditions should be acceptable for a Nyssa, correct?

    Willis
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2007
  2. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Philadelphia PA
    hey willis,

    I have an Autumn Cascade in the ground for 5-6 years. Mine is planted seaside (S.NJ) and the drainage is very fast. This plant benefits from supplemental watering at my location. I found that it grew slowly for a year or 2 then it took off. It is hard to get a good shape Dirr called it "lumpy". The tree reacted to my pruning experiments with quite a few unpredictable shoots. Also the aphids here love it. I wll get back with a pic.

    I am thinking of replacing AC with Zydeco Twist.

    gil
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,715
    Likes Received:
    567
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Stake to get a taller crown instead of cutting back.
     
  4. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Philadelphia PA
    Ron
    Appreciate suggestion. My plant has decent height maybe 12' and produces a semblance of a leader every year! I think i may have 2 issues: 1-It's not getting enough supplemental water to flourish 2- It is naturally unpredictable and may need plenty of time actually "cascade". I'll post a pic as soon as i get back to S.NJ.

    Thanks again
    Gil
     
  5. willis_mckenna

    willis_mckenna Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lombard, IL Z5 USA
    Thanks for the replies. I can definitely see the lumpy part already and have staked a leader to get some height on it. I can't wait to see the fall colors.

    Willis
     
  6. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Philadelphia PA
    Hey Willis,

    Did those fall colors show up? Was it happy with the moist conditions?

    Gil
     
  7. willis_mckenna

    willis_mckenna Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lombard, IL Z5 USA
    I don't remember them being fantastic this fall, kinda an orange. Not bad though. It did color and drop early which supposedly is normal for Nyssa. The wettest part is yet to come. Usually early spring or late winter with a snow melt and frozen ground or lots of rain. We shall see and I'll give it time to work on its color and I am hoping to have the Siberian elm, that is shading it to a degree, pruned this winter to allow more light.

    Bill
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,715
    Likes Received:
    567
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    You might consider the possibility that the elm may drop a limb (or more) on the sour gum sometime and wreck it.
     
  9. willis_mckenna

    willis_mckenna Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lombard, IL Z5 USA
    Da wife won't let me remove it and it is also a border tree shared with my neighbor who probably would like to keep it. It is just a chance I will have to take. I still haven't taken the time to positively ID it as Siberian vs American elm, but I don't like it so I lean towards Siberian (pretty sure though).

    Bill
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,715
    Likes Received:
    567
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    American elm has much larger parts.
     
  11. willis_mckenna

    willis_mckenna Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lombard, IL Z5 USA
    Like myself :)

    That was what I was told to look for also and it seems to favor siberian for mine. I'm still surround by american elms where I work so have a good idea what they look like. Any other traits I should look for to distinguish?

    Bill
     
  12. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,715
    Likes Received:
    567
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    American elm produces leaves 3-6 in. long, those of Siberian elm are mostly less than 3 in. long.
     

Share This Page