Newly planted climbers yellowing and dying?

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by TruckerGirl, May 30, 2006.

  1. TruckerGirl

    TruckerGirl Member

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    Leonore,IL usa
    Last month I planted two roses I bought at the local greenhouse in my bed which has adequate sunlight, good drainage, and is mulched with pine nuggets. My other roses are doing well, albeit they are minis that are well established. These new roses were rather root bound, I used a slow release fertiliser (Miracle Grow) which I've always used when I've planted. The last few days we've ended up with alot of rain. The leaves of both bushes are starting to yellow, no black spots, but they have brown spots, no mildew and no bugs that I can see although some of the leaves look like they've been eaten. Did I do something wrong, are my poor roses destined for the burn pile? Please give me some idea. I'm attaching photos so you can see what I'm speaking of.
    100_1240a.jpg 100_1243.JPG 100_1241.JPG
     
  2. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Apart from yellowing of those lower leaves, what is the health of the other foliage on the plant? It is not unusual for the oldest of the leaves to turn yellow and fall off due to senescence (aging). If the rest of the plant has healthy leaves, then, that's most likely the case and you needn't worry.

    If the younger leaves are also affected, then there is a problem. There is a posting on another thread on this forum (on miniature roses) that discusses the subject of methodically looking for a cause. If there are no other tell tale signs of other diseases, e.g. black spot, then I would check the soil drainage immediately. Poor drainage can very quickly kill a rose.
     
  3. Laurie

    Laurie Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Here is the link to WGs Sherlock approach: http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=14773; and a quote of mine from a recent thread:
    The important point to note about black-spot, a fungal disease, is that it needs seven hours of standing water to multiply. Recommendations to deal with fungal diseases are: 1) choose disease-resistant varieties; 2) grow them in the sunniest part of your garden; 3) give them good air circulation; and 4) water in the morning, below the leaves, if possible. In the first photograph, you do have some leaves which have black spot (even though it may look brown), so I would gently remove those leaves and put them in the burn pile or a sealed bag. Some people actually remove all of the lower leaves because black spot is spread by splashing water, so go ahead a remove all of the yellow leaves as well. On the right in the first photograph, it looks like you have a couple of dead canes so prune those out. I would remove the bark away from the bud union to allow the sun in on the newly developing canes; then cover the bud union again in winter. If you aren't yet aware of pruning for good air circulation, prune the canes to apple green wood and remove canes crossing in the middle. The drainage issue is critical, so check that. If problems continue, let us know.
     
  4. cormac

    cormac Member

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    i find that the lower leaves on new roses more often than not turn yellow anyway so i always remove them -- but definitely take all the advice given here ... :) post some more pics when they bloom -- what kind are they btw? (just curious) :)

    i don't use chemical fertilizers tho -- the only time i use chemicals in the garden at all are when i do the seasonly war with japanese beatles ... i try and eat bananas for my own benefit but then will take the peels and bury them next to (perhaps 4 inches or so away from) my roses ... i rotate around the garden so they all get about 2 or 3 throughout the season -- they love potassium and it's a much more natural way to do it i think ... also we have heavy clay so any natural amendment to the soil is a plus ... i think also epsom salts are recommended for magnesium -- i do this in the early wet spring time ... just a small teaspoon sprinkled in about an 8 inch circle is good i've found ... i'm very careful with this since salt can be harmful to so many living things :) -- you might also for at least the time being, to pull the mulch back some from the plant and let it get some air at the bottom ... it seems that pretty often my problems begin when i have put the mulch up against the plant ... they seem to prefer to have as much air as they can at the bottom as well :)

    oh and also just in general, remove any leaves or debris from the roses -- put the debris in a bushel or bucket and remove them from the area ... doing this will help with keeping disease down ... pick up the debris gently so as not to rub off anything that might be harmful :)
     

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