New to growing daylilies, questions

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by flowercents, Mar 9, 2006.

  1. flowercents

    flowercents Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Fraser Valley, Canada
    There was 1 lonely daylily in our yard when we moved, and I was thinking of adding a couple more. The one I have is about 14" high. Is that shorter than most? Anyway, I'm looking for a variety that is long blooming, but not orange or yellow colored. Any suggestions? Have you heard of purple d'oro and is it any good? I've heard good things about stella d'oro but don't want yellow.
     
  2. oscar

    oscar Active Member

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    Location:
    Surrey, England
    Little wine cup....mine repeat blooms up to the frosts...after saying that, the catalogue says its only supposed to bloom for 2 months, maybe i just got a good 1.....14" i would think is on the shorter side for daylilies.
     
  3. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
  4. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Maryland USA zone 7
    There are also everblooming daylilies. A google search will turn up several sites. They come in different heights and some are even fragrant. The Apster collection is a good one to go with too. We planted 'Big Time Happy' and it's a soft yellow and fragrant. Blooms it's head off in my daughter's zone 7 garden.
    http://www.happyeverappster.com/happy/varieties.asp

    Newt
     
  5. dryflygirl

    dryflygirl Member

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    Location:
    vancouver
    Hi,

    I love daylilies and have them planted in my sunny garden. I do have some in partial sun, under my maple tree. I will post some pics when they bloom, right now they're just sticking out of the soil.
    They're very hardy and grow almost in any type of soil.

    Here's a website I could useful.
    http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/pages/publicationD.jsp?publicationId=204

    Happy planting.

    M
     

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