Neighbor's Plant for Identification

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by lkliewer, Jun 13, 2004.

  1. lkliewer

    lkliewer Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Kelowna, BC
    Here is another bush that my neighbor is trying to identify. She said it hasn't had any flowers that she knows of. The plant stays fairly low to the ground. Here are some pictures of the leaves -- two from above and one of the underside of the leaf. You can see my fingers to judge the size of the leaves -- about 2-3 inches long. If anybody would like additional information about it I can just walk over and get it. (To me the leaves look like the leaves of a 1000 other bushes -- hopefully not to everyone though)
     

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  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Metro Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    may be a Viburnum species. opposite paired leaves, pubescence on the underside...
     
  3. Douglas Justice

    Douglas Justice Well-Known Member UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
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    It looks to be one of the numerous Viburnum x burkwoodii (V. carlesii x V. utile) cultivars. These are reliably hardy plants, but semi-deciduous in the Vancouver area, and rarely grown. In a cold winter, they can look pretty shabby with lots of yellowing leaves that won't let go. If it's really mild, the leaves remain glossy and green, but the habit is generally pretty floppy in our dull, rainy-winter climate. If it is left unpruned, V. x burkwoodii will produce flattened heads of pink-budded, white, fragrant flowers in early spring (it can be pruned after flowering).
     

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