Identification: Need plant ID

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Howard Goldstein, Sep 17, 2005.

  1. Howard Goldstein

    Howard Goldstein Member

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    I would like to know i anyone knows what this plant is. So far all I have drawn is a blank. See attached picture please.

    Thanks....Howard G., Atlanta GA..USA
     

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  2. Marn

    Marn Active Member 10 Years

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    that is a Pitcher Plant ... i dont know which one as there is many .. but if you search google you will be able to find it.. nice plant .. they are kinda like a venus flytrap ..

    good luck

    Marn
     
  3. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    "Pitcher plants" or carnivorous plants with pitchers in their armoury have a wide distribution worldwide. What you have is a variety of tropical pitcher - Nepenthes. I grew up on the island of Borneo (which accounts for my unduly long arms - I had to swing from tree to tree. Eh, just kidding!). These things are common and considered a weed where I grew up. Although it looks like your plant is developing a trunk, in it's natural habitat, they actually develop into long canes. I remember my mother collecting those pitchers, cleaning them up, using them as natural containers for cooking glutinous rice and other goodies. It is an interesting plant, a sure-fire conversational piece. I.e., I wish I have one.
     
  4. flytrap

    flytrap Active Member

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    Nope ...your plant is not a Nepenthes ... but it does look quite cool.
     
  5. Ginger Blue

    Ginger Blue Active Member

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    It's a croton.
     
  6. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

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    Ginger Blue,

    With the tendrils and leaves growing from the original leaves, I would have bet it was a Nepenthes or at least a pitcher plant of some genus. Do you have a species for the Croton with this attribute? I would have looked for it myself but there were over 500 listed here.

    And to Weekend gardener,

    Does the pitcher then form from secondary leaves? They must go through a terrific transformation to finally form the pitcher.

    Harry
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2006
  7. Ginger Blue

    Ginger Blue Active Member

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    Hi Harry, no, I don't have a species in mind. But I've had crotons before with this particular habit of the leaf blade being absent for part of the leaf length, with only the midvein remaining. What's particularly familiar is the way the leaf dips a bit when the leaf re-emerges toward the end. Aside from this "hanging" leaf feature, this plant resembles Croton in every other way. Leaf structure, petiole, trunk, etc.

    Admittedly, I'm not real familiar with Nepenthes, but I don't believe it's a woody plant. This one appears to be woody or at least semi-woody.

    Also, I should mention that Croton is a common name. I'm referring to Codiaeum variegatum. I've searched a bit for one with this feature and didn't come real close. Here's a page with the various leaf forms, including how this leaf blade can become absent for a bit. See the form 'Appendiculatum'. http://www.croton-mania.com/Leaf_Photos.html

    Here's one that's a bit similar. See the one labelled "Soiraya". Not the same type at all, but you can see how the leaves will do this with crotons. http://www.wanapluk.com/croton-plant/
     
  8. Ginger Blue

    Ginger Blue Active Member

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  9. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi Ginger Blue,

    I think you have it there. I'm not familiar with Nepenthes either. The person who took the picture you link to above even says on the web page that it is more red now, presuming he meant after he took the picture. I looked at a lot of Nepenthes, and didn't see any pictures of just leaves growing from the larger leaves. I suppose that could be that most were sellers and were intrested in the insectivore aspect of the plant and so took pictures of mostly the fly trap. But even those photos from various gardens and greenhouses didn't show any. So now I think Croton, too, or Codiaeum variegatum.

    Harry
     
  10. Ginger Blue

    Ginger Blue Active Member

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    I'm glad this came up because I've never looked into Nepenthes before. I only knew of Sarracenia being a pitcher plant. I got to learn a whole new genus!

    Yeah, those crotons are pretty nifty with all their leaf variations. Searching through them makes me wish I lived where I could grow them outside.
     
  11. jarrett622

    jarrett622 Active Member

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    You might try this link: http://www.exoticangel.com/

    Hope it comes out ok....when you get there, look at the left menu>click 250 varieties and select the Codiaeum (Crotons). The Mother Daughter has some the attributes of your plant. I have one of these and it has 'daughter leaves' that grow from the main leaf. I'm guessing that's where the common name, Mother & Daughter, comes from. ;-)

    Info on Crotons can be found here: http://www.exoticangel.com/Varieties/Codiaeum.htm

    Barbara
     
  12. Equilibrium

    Equilibrium Active Member

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    I am not all that familiar with Croton however I am somewhat familiar with Nepenthes. The plant photographed is not a Nepenthes.
     
  13. tecotodd

    tecotodd Member

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    Hey Howard, I am sure by now you believe your plant is a mother and daughter croton.. I can absolutley assure you that it is in fact a mother and daughter croton. I had first seen one 4 years ago and for the life of me could not remember the name; other than it was in the croton family. Well, I have finally found one while I was following signs that read " BIG PLANT SALE TODAY" along the road. I had no idea where I was going but I wanted to go. Turns out it was a little "mom and pop" operation(which if you like the unusual plants ..... thats where you get them)and it just so happened she had 6 one gallon plants. IIIIIIIIIIII had to have one. I have searched for years. The nice lady did not want to sell any of them!!!!!!!! I was paniced..Had to have one. Begged her for one..... She finally agreed and I told her I was going home, sit in a chair and watch it grow. I was so elated.. I am a freak about odd plants. Anyways I am very happy for you to have found your answer.... And very happy for me finding what you already had.... Great day Todd
     
  14. carnivorous plant girl!

    carnivorous plant girl! Member

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    Definitely not a nepenthes, they are supposed to grow pitchers out of the tendrils, not leaves, hence the common name: tropical pitcher plant
     
  15. Rima

    Rima Active Member

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    It's a Croton!
     
  16. rebner

    rebner Member

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    Hey Howard,
    I had 2 plants just like this a few years ago, one in the office and one at home, which I had bought as Mother-and-Daughter (Croton var. L.), supposedly a variety from Sri Lanka.

    They were beautiful, grew to a 3' stem and had a spagetti-like thin root network

    I have been looking to find some again...ideas anyone?

    Thanks-Reinhard
     
  17. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    The plant may be Nepenthes khasiana Hk. f. This bears a bit more investigation but that species has the appearance of a croton leaf yet bears pitchers. If in fact this is what you are growing the species is considered an endangered species. I am attempting to research the species further and if you can possibly post a better close-up photo of both the pitcher and the leaf blade that will make trying to determine the actual species some easier. Typically, nepenthes species are epiphytic plants which simply means a plant that grows on another plant. Nepenthes generally do not like soil and prefer a humus mix composed mostly of dead vegetation (leaves). Most growers use a mixture of pure peat, Perlite, and orchid potting media keeping the mixture moist at all times. If you can possibly provide a close-up of both the blade and the pitcher hopefully we can isolate the species.
     
  18. rebner

    rebner Member

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    Hi photopro,
    I'll dig out another photo by chance, but looking at the two pictures at the start of this string (Howard), I am pretty certain that this is not a Nepenthes but a Codiaeum variegatum mother daughter-type Croton.
    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8021&d=1126967599
    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8022&d=1126967599
    Like these, mine did not have a pitcher - even though the 'daughter' leaves are slightly pitcher shaped.

    I found some more photos on TopTropicals:
    http://toptropicals.com/pics/new_photos/04/bloom/4101.jpg
    http://toptropicals.com/pics/new_photos/04/bloom/4099.jpg
    http://toptropicals.com/pics/garden/m1/croton_gallery.htm

    R
     
  19. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Howard, can you tell me if the pitchers of your plant look like this photo?
     
  20. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Sorry about that. Try this again. Does it look like this photo?
     

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  21. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    I just put your photo in PhotoShop and blew it up about 500%. Regretably the "pitcher" appears to be an illusion and is not a pitcher at all. Appears the others in the discussion are certainly on the right path to this identification.
     
  22. Equilibrium

    Equilibrium Active Member

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    Hello photopro. I believe you may have Nepenthes khasiana there. Good growing. Ideal night time temps you must have for your plant and nice lighting to be able to produce those reds in your pitcher. Do you trim yours back to encourage basal growth or do you leave it go?
     
  23. Equilibrium

    Equilibrium Active Member

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    What else do you grow if you don't mind my asking. I am partial to highlands myself however I do grow around 15 lowland species. N. khasiana was one of the first Neps I began growing.
     
  24. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    The vast majority of my collection is aroids and plants other than "insect eaters". I have a few, some very large but those are not my specialty. I simply enjoy researching exotic species and had read about Nepenthes khasiana. The photo was a little deceptive since several viewers thought, as did I, we were seeing a pitcher. When I took the photo and blew it up 500% it became obvious the "pitcher" was actually a leaf extension. Don't know about the rest but I'd be interested in seeing a good discussion on this board about the exotic species of Nepenthes of which there are quite a few including those that have enormous pitchers. I specialize in primarily exotic and rare Philodendrons and Anthuriums from South and Central America.
     
  25. Equilibrium

    Equilibrium Active Member

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    The cultural requirements vary from species to species however some similarities exist amongst the highlands as well as amongst the lowlands of Nepenthes. Myself personally, I'm more into North American indigenous species. I play with Nepenthes and am in a learning phase myself given there are those out there who have forgotten more than I have ever or will ever know about Nepenthes. Same thing for Pinguicula, Roridula, and Drosera. I can hold my own with Dionaea and Sarracenia however those are indigenous species and I am somewhat familiar with the fragile ecosystems in which they grow.
     

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