Identification: Need help identifying a house plant

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by jonesb-mtaonline, Jun 9, 2004.

  1. jonesb-mtaonline

    jonesb-mtaonline Member

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    Location:
    Knik, Alaska
    For the most part the photos show the plant better than I can describe it. The only thing I want to point out is that the new leaves come on two opposing sides only, making the base wide in one direction and narrow in the other. I would also like to know if it will hurt the main plant to take the smaller offshoot. The offshoot seems to be very firmly attached at the roots, enough so that separating them appears that it would require cutting them apart. Thanks for your help.
     

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  2. hungry hippo

    hungry hippo Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi JM,
    I don't think it would cause any lasting damage to the parent plant, but it would probably increase the offshoot's chances of survival if you waited a little while until it had developed more of its own root system. I have divided a lot of clivias (which is what I believe your plant is, most likely a C. miniata hybrid), and found that I have been most successful when they have been almost totally root-bound. Although they are often classed as "bulbous", they do have more of a tuberous/fibrous root system which promotes propagation by division at that point. I have also found that they flower best when root-bound. A large plant in say a gallon pot will yield many, many new plants, but they often don't flower well for a couple of years. You can also propagate them from the seed/berries that follow the flowers (although quite often they do not come in true to color from seed) Wash your hands after handling the berries/pulp, they are quite toxic. Hope this was helpful. Good luck!
     
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Just a quick comment - I think it's a beautiful plant.
     
  4. jonesb-mtaonline

    jonesb-mtaonline Member

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    Knik, Alaska
    Thanks for the information hungy hippo. Also thanks from my co-worker for the compliment on the plant from Daniel Mosquin. For my part in identifying the plant, photographing it and posting to your site, I get the offshoot.
     
  5. douglas

    douglas Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    princegeorge b.c
    Hi Good trade.
    Regards Doug
     
  6. Davidm

    Davidm Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Iowa,Midwest,usda zone 5,USA
    Ok.This plant is a Clivia.It perfers to be rootbound.It would be better for the plant if you did not remove any of the offshoots.
     
  7. Margaret

    Margaret Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Sunshine Coast, B C Canada
    Most timely. I was given one as a gift a few months ago and the flowering has long since stopped. Was wondering if I need to let it die back or keep watering to get into the flowering cycle? Will certainly keep it pot bound.
     
  8. lilypad

    lilypad Member

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    Location:
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    Clivia Miniatas are lovely. I have had one for years. I believe it comes from South Africa originally. They bloom early in the year and then rest until the next year. I water mine sparingly from autumn onwards until spring. Mine tends to bloom early-mid spring which is surprising on these UK latitudes but because the plant comes from where it does, I am no longer surprised. My clivia likes it really cool in winter. I believe this helps it to rest with the lesser watering. Too much heat in the winter has probably caused my clivia not to bloom this year.

    I have also separated many of the off-shoots from my main plants. There never was really any damage to any of the plants as long as there was a decent amount of root for all sections to establish themselves.

    Lilypad
     
  9. Late

    Late Active Member

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    Location:
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    I have a clivia which I've had for several years. There was a question regarding them on a phone in plant show just yesterday the expert said they need a two month cool period during the winter with very little water and a temperature of about 50 degrees farenheit to produce blooming. He also suggested that a new pup be at least 1 foot long before separating it. Hope this is helpful to you.

    Norma
     

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