Appreciation: Need help for rootless Ponytail Palm

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by escapingcat, Apr 3, 2014.

  1. escapingcat

    escapingcat New Member

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    Hello..I need help for this as today I received the Ponytail Palm I purchased via Internet. I was however very shocked that when I tried to open the bag and move the plant to the pot I had prepared that the plant was apparently way too overwatered that the ball had detached itself from the roots and hence it is rootless.

    I contacted the seller who claimed that this plant would just survive as long it is placed under soil and give it a month otherwise he will reimburse me full amount.

    I had noticed that the three sprouts are still green but the plant is rootless! Please advise if it will survive under this condition and what do I need to do to have the roots spawning again? Or even what do I have to do to just revive it.

    Thank you and I really love this plant, it is my favourite.
     
  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    A scan of discussions of this plant in GardenWeb seem to confirm what the seller claims. There were a number of postings claiming success of growing on caudexes without any roots.
     
  3. OzPlantlady

    OzPlantlady New Member

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    Hi all we were given a huge Ponytail yesterday and during loading it one of the "arms" broke off wondering if it can be saved = rooted?
    Your suggestions are greatly appreciated
     
  4. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    Pony tail palms are good at regenerating new shoots from the main "foot" after a branch breaks off, and they're also good at rooting pups that have formed naturally beside the foot; but I have seen a couple references saying people did not have success rooting the branches. Couldn't hurt to try though!
    If you did try, use a razor-clean cut, rooting hormone with fungicide, prune back the leaves to reduce transpiration, very bright light but not direct sunlight, perlite medium, and most importantly very high, consistent humidity with air movement. That method will practically root a fence post. ;)
     
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  5. OzPlantlady

    OzPlantlady New Member

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    Hi Tom,
    Thank you for your reply I took a risk and planted without any fuss as I already knew they were tough, the piece that broke off the main plant had a chunk of the actual bulb so I figured give it a go and now 6 weeks later I already have new leaf shoots and the beginnings of a flower spike.
    I have tried many times in the past to root broken branches without any luck, I believe my success this time is due to the fact that the base of the broken branch was from the bulb.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2017

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