Name of Technique

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Junglekeeper, Mar 10, 2006.

  1. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    I've seen instances where a branch is partially cut and bent over in order to encourage the growth of a dormant bud below the break. What is this technique called?
     
  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    layering? air layering?
     
  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Hi, Paul. No. That's trying to root the section. This method is used for forcing a bud. I'll see if I can find a picture of what I mean.
     
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Have a look at Image 23 in this document on T-budding citrus. I'm wondering if there is a name for doing this when used as a way to force a dormant bud in any tree. Come to think of it, is this in fact an accepted way to force a bud for the purpose of reshaping a tree? I currently trying this on two different trees.
     
  5. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    keeper, gotcha, I was thinking of something else.
     
  6. oscar

    oscar Active Member

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    i know exactley what you mean.....but i cant for the life of me think of what its called.....there is also the thing with hedges, where they cut and lay the hedge (old english tradition, which i think is almost gone)

    latent budding...seems to pop into my head..if i think of it i'll be sure and post up.
     
  7. Margaret

    Margaret Active Member 10 Years

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    Junglekeeper. Don't know the name but I tried this with some roses last year and it worked!
    Oscar, as an expat Brit. your post rang a bell. Did you mean "laying" a hedge? If so hedgelaying.org.uk/faq.htm may be of interest. I remember being told that you could tell the age of a hedge by the number of different plants making up the hedge. One per hundred years as I remember and that worked with our 1500 home in Yorkshire.
    Margaret
     
  8. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    Hi,

    I cant find the name of the technique exactly, but I think I can help. I recognize the idea of breaking rather than cutting from some reading I did on grafting fruit tree. The plan is that some sort of side graft is inserted into the tree. Then when the graft is established the top of the tree (your rootstock) is bent over and broken so that your graft will grow up and become the new treetop. The bending is done over cutting to reduce the bleeding and stress on the tree. Once it has died then it can be cut off.

    Ive just been looking for a while trying to find a name for that technique, but I cant. If it actually has a name other than breaking/bending over the top of the rootstock, you will find it buried in writings about fruit tree grafting.

    Hope that helps. This is the only mention Ive seen of breaking limbs. In any other case you would just prune the tree.

    Michael
     
  9. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Nice to know this works as these are my first attempts with this technique. It made sense to keep the nutrients flowing in the branch in order to increase the chance of getting the bud to grow.

    I guess this is common in various propagation methods; the document referenced above involved T-budding. I'm sure that's where I got the idea from in the first place. If it works in forcing a newly introduced bud, then surely it would work with an existing bud.
     
  10. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hedgelaying comment made me think of pleaching, but I dont think thats the right term yet either...
     
  11. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    It'll turn out to be the 'Just Do It' method :)
     
  12. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    If the attempt is to force a bud break on a lower bud
    whereby the top portion of the branch or stem has
    been cut, bent over and is not related to propagation,
    I would think it is a form of top-working, a forced
    change in the top of the tree and as such pollarding
    is also a form of top-working.

    In regards to the lopping and bending reference in
    the link document, we had a different method of
    applying these terms in the nursery. For Winter
    grafting of a certain plant we would break the top,
    bend it over and then make a cut right on the
    underside of where the rootstock top had been
    broken. We called this lopping. For the Spring
    and for some Summer grafts of the same plant
    we would break the top of the rootstock, bend it
    over, not make a cut and we called this bending.
    Most people equate the lopping and bending to
    budding. Like as in the article most commonly
    used in t-budding for Citrus and Fruit Trees,
    among others.

    The technique to us was lopping when we made
    a cut in the rootstock top which also entails the
    bending of the top over. I do not believe there
    is a technical name for the lopping and the bending
    in relation to propagation but there may be one
    that I am not aware of.

    Jim
     
  13. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Thanks for the info, Jim.
     

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