mystery tree in our garden

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Michael Anderson, Jun 26, 2004.

  1. Michael Anderson

    Michael Anderson Member

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    Location:
    Coquitlam
    Hello all, we just moved from North Van to Coquitlam and found ourselves with a lovely if neglected garden. While most of the plants have proved readily identifiable, this tree (which I have seen before in other neighbourhoods) remains a mystery. When we arrived in May, it had BIG droopy white blooms. Now it has developed many tiny pods (see inset in image) that blacken after dropping off.

    Thanks for any help,
    Michael.
     

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  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Metro Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Looks like a Magnolia seiboldii aka Oyama Magnolia, fragrant white flowers with a red center, may still have the odd bloom on it.
     
  3. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Black Ceek, B.C., Canada
    Paul,

    I'm not sure it is M. sieboldii, see attached image of same.
    Different leaf shape, the leaves do not curl up, it is not as glossy and the underside of the leaves are downy.
     

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  4. Michael Anderson

    Michael Anderson Member

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    Thanks gentlemen for your suggestions. Our leaves do seem different from the ones in Chris's image. They are quite elongate and leathery. The flowers on this tree were, as I say, big and droopy and rather fragile-looking, pure white, five-petalled if I remember. Wish I had photographed one, but you know how it is when you've just moved - with a very active 1-year old!

    :)
    Michael.
     
  5. Michael Anderson

    Michael Anderson Member

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    The pods though - I see them in Chris's image - do look similar, I guess this is a typical Magnolia feature?

    Michael.
     
  6. Michael Anderson

    Michael Anderson Member

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    I think this is it! I started Googling for "Magnolia flowers" and came across this image that has a solid resemblance to ours (at least in memory). Forget what I said about 5-petalled, that was definitely a false memory.

    cheers,
    Michael.
     

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  7. CaptClam

    CaptClam Member

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    Location:
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    Sure looks like...

    It looks like some kind of Citus Tree doesn't it? I would swear it was a blood orange tree if it were not for the pods. When does it flower and what do the staimen (sp) look like?

    Kirk
     
  8. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Michael,

    the seed pods are typical of the genus and aid in identification.
    Images of M. sieboldii flower and mature seedpod.
     

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  9. raichael

    raichael Member

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    Location:
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  10. Michael Anderson

    Michael Anderson Member

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    My gosh raichael, that's it! I wonder how old ours is, because let me assure you, it is no shrub, but a solid tree at least 8 feet tall with a big full crown. I haven't tape-measured it or anything but I couldn't get both hands around the trunk. The whole neighbourhood is only 30 years old though..."slow-growing"? Maybe it was transplanted here.

    Thanks all for your reponses, it is a wonderful tree and I only wish I could see the mature seed pods but I can't imagine it's being pollinated, thus the green seed pods dropping and turning black (very quickly!).

    best,
    Michael.
     
  11. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Hi Michael:

    If you can provide an image of the entire plant that
    can help us for now. I think you will have to show
    us an image of an actual flower next Spring for us
    to know for sure whether this deciduous Magnolia
    is a Stellata or not. You can always post to this
    forum then. Just bookmark this thread for future
    reference.

    There are many forms of deciduous Magnolias that
    many people even in the nursery trade and the most
    knowledgeable people in Magnolias have not ever
    seen. For right now this Magnolia may indeed be
    considered to be a Stellata but this plant can be
    determined later very easily to be another species
    of Magnolia altogether. To better identify a
    Magnolia, the plant almost has to be seen in
    bloom.

    Jim
     

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