Identification: Mystery Evergreen

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by Bill, Aug 27, 2019.

  1. Bill

    Bill Active Member 10 Years

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    Does anyone know what this tree might be? Whorls are about 2-5 cm across. The tree is about 3 metres tall.

    Growing in North Vancouver in the garden of a tree collector (former owner, so no available info from current owner).
     

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  2. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    Looks like a Larch.
    Maybe an Alpine larch (Larix lyallii)
     
  3. Bill

    Bill Active Member 10 Years

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    Good suggestion, but most of that species I recall had much more upright needle whorls - like small pincushions. The ones on this tree are pretty flat. Could certainly be some sort of Larch, though.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  5. Bill

    Bill Active Member 10 Years

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    Had a suggestion from Harold Greer that I think nailed it - Pseudolarix amabilis

    Thanks for the feedback!
     
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Ah, that's a great match!
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yep, Pseudolarix amabilis - it forms much longer spur shoots than Larix spp. do.

    As an aside, of course not an evergreen!
     

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