My mugo

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by wbgarden, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. wbgarden

    wbgarden Member

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    Hi,
    as to my opinion, dwarf cultivars of pinus mugo are the best plants for small and rock gardens. Let mi introduce my mugo. It is derived from witch´s broom, I found 6 years ago. I grafted some scions and you see very dwarf an very nice new plant. You can see more, starting new witch on this grafted mugo. New one is grafted too...
    Jan -wbgarden - witch´s broom garden

    http://wbgarden.com
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 12, 2006
  2. oscar

    oscar Active Member

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    That's fantastic :D i got to say im a big fan of dwarf pines.
     
  3. wbgarden

    wbgarden Member

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    Hi Oscar,
    all pines I like, Got make it personally... More than 500 cult. of pines I have on my wbgarden. Mostly dwarf of course, derived from witch´s broom.
    Jan
    http://wbgarden.com
     
  4. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Can you tell me why you feel this Mugo Pine is
    a witches broom and did not come about as a result
    of a branch or twig sport instead? If we were to
    come to Prague to visit you from Passau after our
    two day visit to the Passauer Glasmuseum I'd ask
    you that question.

    Guenter told me that he has gone into Prague from
    Passau and this below shows how close in proximity
    those cities really are.

    Passau, Germany Travel Guide | Photos, Map, Blogs, Time Zone

    Jim
     
  5. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I think the Mugo Pines have shown the best adaptability
    of any of the dwarf Pines. Not all of the selected cultivars
    came about naturally however, as some were produced and
    propagated as a result of induced sports. Witches brooms
    do happen with Mugo, so I am curious as to why you think
    your Mugo is a witches broom as the smaller growth as seen
    in your photo to me is more of a sport. Essentially the same
    kind of sport to which 'Sherwood dwarf' came about from.
    My personal favorite Mugo Pine for rock gardens and for
    landscaping is 'Mops'. We are a little too warm here for
    the aurea forms.

    You should be rather proud of your work as you have a
    beautiful and well thought out set up and garden layout
    where you are. Let enough people see photos of your
    garden and you should have lots of Conifer and plant
    enthusiasts wanting to come see your dazzling array
    of beautiful and well cared for plants.

    Jim
     
  6. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    Quote You should be rather proud of your work as you have a
    beautiful and well thought out set up and garden layout
    where you are. Let enough people see photos of your
    garden and you should have lots of Conifer and plant
    enthusiasts wanting to come see your dazzling array
    of beautiful and well cared for plants. Unquote

    Well said Mr.Shep - only I would have to come home with a lot of them as well.
     
  7. wbgarden

    wbgarden Member

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    Hi Jim,
    my problem is, that is difficult for me to understand, not only in english.., what is sport " sport, a spontaneous mutation from the plant..., Sports seem to be more common on highly bred plants, such as roses, chrysanthemums and perpetual-flowering carnations and also occur frequently as a result of micropropagation."
    and what is witch´s broom ?
    " Some conifer species mutate prolifically. Most of these mutations are discovered in the wild by enthusiasts who spend countless hours appreciating the beauty of nature as they spy towards the heavens looking for witches brooms or congested areas of trees that may yield the next diminutive beauty. After locating the tree with a sport.."
    Let´s have a example. Yesterday was destroyed 60 years old mutation of Pinus rotundata, photo enclosed. As to your opinion, is it witch or only sport.
    Jan - wbgarden
    PS. My name is Jan Slama and I live in Ostrava, Czech republic. It 400 km from Prague.
     

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  8. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Jan:

    I was hoping you were in Bohemia but my physician
    will love it if I went to Krakow as he was born near
    there.

    We can disagree on this and that will not be a problem.
    The other growth looks to me like a sport which you
    may have learned it as being a witches broom and that
    is okay. A witches broom for a Pine to me is a marked
    difference in how the needles are shaped and in their
    structure. As an example, a witches broom we found
    on a Calabrian Pine had needles only one inch (2.5cm)
    long and was a solid mass of growth about one half
    foot (15cm) tall high up in a tree in which all the other
    needles were about 6 inches (15cm) in length. There
    was a color difference in the needles also in which the
    witches broom were a golden cast in color and there
    was a curving, twisting to the needles that the host Pine
    did not have. As long as I know what you mean by a
    "witch´s broom" then we can talk Conifers. Sorry, I
    thought your garden was in Prague.

    What form of Mugo did your plant above come from?

    Jim
     
  9. oscar

    oscar Active Member

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    Witchs broom, sport, pure semantics, they are probably one and the same, if not, makes no never mind to me, at the end of the day it's the discovery of something new that makes life worth living.
    Good luck with all your pines.
     
  10. treelover3

    treelover3 Active Member

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    I do agree with Oscar that it really is just semantics.

    Although, in my mind's eye, a sport is a growth that has changed in some way from the original plant and a witch's broom is a reduction in growth rate and plant size from the original plant.

    A plant that produces a variegated branch would be considered a sport and a plant that has produced a branch that is growing at half the rate of the original plant would be considered a witch's broom. And it would be a-dream-come-true if both features were found being produced together on the same branch (the branch would also display a contorted growth habit as well as exfoliating bark). (:o)

    Jan,
    I hope you can save the broom by grafting some scions or giving the broom to someone who can graft the plant to save it.
    Mike
     
  11. wbgarden

    wbgarden Member

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    Just semantics, yes..,
    as to scions I am changing regulary with my friends and I am still looking for somebody from Noth America who want to change small amounts of scions.
    I have about 20 to 30 new witches every year.
    Enclose image - last year hunts - only picea....
    Jan - wbgarden
    http://wbgarden.com
     

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  12. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I doubt that will be possible with the plant health legislation now. Both USDA and Canadian authorites, and the EU, are very cautious and restrictive about live conifer foliage, given the importance of conifers in the economy and the number of potentially devastating pests and diseases that could be transferred
     
  13. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    A Conifer sport can change the size and/or
    color of a needle. A witches broom changes
    the shape or texture of the needle. How many
    Conifers do you know of in which an unusual
    growth in the tree had rounded tips at the ends
    of the needles as opposed to having the normal
    sharp pointed tips instead?

    Of these two Pines below which one came
    about as a witches broom and which came
    about as a sport?

    Pinus parviflora 'Recurva' *
    Pinus parviflora 'Tortuosa'

    By the way, Sir Harold Hillier called the
    bun shaped unusual growth high up in a
    non-cultivated tree, that most all of us
    call a witches broom including me at
    one time, a Pygmy.

    *Note, let me point out that as I remember
    it Mr. Humphrey J. Welch in one of his books
    also lists an Akamatsu of the same cultivar
    name, Pinus densiflora 'Recurva'.

    Jim
     
  14. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I think I already made mention that whether these are
    sports or witches brooms as I learned them to be is
    not a big deal. There is a difference in them if we
    want to get technical about it. Another more common
    plant to look at for seeing the differences of these are
    Japanese Maples. We can see with some of the broom
    cultivars just how the witches broom affects the middle
    lobe of the leaf, whereas sports can occur on many of
    the Maple cultivars more frequently in nature or seen
    much more often than witches brooms in cultivation.

    I have a strong affection for Conifers anyway and the
    person that taught me the most regarding Conifers
    would go wild with all of these Pygmies Jan has. I
    am just to glad to see that there are people still willing
    to explore and find these mutants of nature as they really
    do make some of the choicest plants in any garden once
    they have been handled properly and propagated with
    care to perpetuate them.

    I am sure there are several people licking their chops
    wishing they could get their hands on them. There are
    ways to share wood from continent to continent but it
    indeed has become tougher legally to ship live plants
    than in the past, although that can still be done also.
    It is just that today there are more restrictions on how
    those plants can be shipped to comply with requirement
    and certification standards from the departing country
    to the destination country. More than likely the plants
    will have to be shipped bare root, sans any soil and only
    after a series of root and needle fumigation.

    Jim
     

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