My Crimson Queen Tragedy

Discussion in 'Maples' started by ichoudhury, May 11, 2014.

  1. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

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    I've had my Crimson Queen since she was just a stick (Graft from Ebay) and she grew before my eyes, and at one point planted her in by backyard. Recently during a storm, a huge branch from another tree fell on her and broke about 90% and left 10% by nearly thread. I did not have the mental strength to try to put together what was lost. Fast forward about two weeks, I am thinking of taking some steps to try what's possible.

    -As an immediate action, I have thread grafted one of the tiny branch from whats alive to the rootstock. I will wait to see if that works out, but meanwhile, I have another thought and that's where I need your help.

    I also have a Red Filigree that's growing for the last 2.5 years without much progress on the size (I know they are extremely slow grower, so I'm just letting it grow in the backyard).

    Will it make any difference in the growth rate if I attempt 'Thread Graft" with the Red Filigree to the rootstock Crimson Queen was Scion to? My plan would be to move the Red Filigree to a pot, thread graft against the injured Crimson Queen's Root stalk and if it takes, keep the Red Filigree's non grafted part, later take crimson queen part still stuck to the tree off and turn it into a bigger Red Filigree?

    Is it possible?
     
  2. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

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    Here's a before and after shot :(
     

    Attached Files:

  3. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    That sure is a tragedy, you have my sympathies.

    I don't know much about thread grafting so can't really comment on that, but look up "approach grafting", that might be the best way to join the two plants for the desired result.
     
  4. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

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    Thanks for the suggestion ... I will definitely be researching on the 'approach grafting' which I just heard for the first time! I learn something everyday :)

    Meanwhile, still watching the 'thread grafting' approach I took and hopping for some progress.
     
  5. DougieMapleSeed

    DougieMapleSeed Active Member

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    I would just leave the Crimson Queen graft alone and work with what branches you still have left. Physically support the existing foliage with staking until it is able to heal enough to hold its own weight again. Look on the bright side, despite losing a large portion of the foliage, you still have a root system capable of supporting a tree of the size before the damage. The tree will react quickly by sprouting new branches in order to bring the foliage back in balance with the size of the large root system. Just make sure that what sprouts is coming out of the Crimson Queen grafted portion and not the rootstock, discourage any branches trying to sprout from below the graft line simply by rubbing them out with your fingers. A thread graft takes a long time before it actually grafts to the tree, so I doubt that is the best course of action to take.
     
  6. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

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    portion that still hanging by a thread appears to be severely damage for it to recover in the next few years. By the way, damage is right on the graft line, so if I were to loose that for any unforeseen cause, that will be the end (thus my attempt at the graft while there is still a chance) .

    Meanwhile, I will do/try anything to support the remaining Crimson Queen, while administer the 'thread graft' .... not too optimistic anyway since this is my first attempt :(
     

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