musa question

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by honolua, Jul 13, 2008.

  1. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    Hi,
    I have a musa basjoo which is doing very well, with several new pups. The one thing however, is that as each new leaf appears (and right now, that is at a great rate!), the lower ones seem to be a bit "droopy" and almost appear to be "pealing" away from the stalk. Is this wilting-like change anything to worry about? Is it simply the weight of all the new leaves? Help!
    thanks
     
  2. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Nothing to worry about as long as you're supplying regular watering, which would be the case since it's growing rapidly. It's a natural occurance and can be trimmed away as they fade.
    Is it potted or in-ground?

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  3. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    Hi,
    It is in a large, cedar pot right now, and we think we may need to transplant it into the ground next spring. Today, I have come home to find one leaf entirely bent over and pointing to the ground.....shall I cut it off?

    I have fertilizer in the pot, well-drained soil, and as I mentioned, there are 4 new pups that have sprung up in the last 3 weeks, now one foot tall each....so I think it is thriving. I water it daily, but is this too much? Is it possible to over-water it? It has been so nice, sunny and hot here lately in the lower mainland, with no rain for a couple of weeks, so I keep thinking the musa needs water..

    Help! I appreciate your advice!
     
  4. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    It'll be fine as long as dark blotchy spots don't develop on the leaves, a sign of over watering. It seems healthy by your discription of 4 new pups (offsets) which have started.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  5. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    Thanks,
    I have another question: I am looking to transplant it from it's container, into the ground. I have a spot where a dying tree was just removed. Roots were everywhere! We would love to plant the musa in that spot, as it would look great there, and have some protection from wind etc.. Here is the challenge: it is right off the corner of the house, and would be 1-2 feet away from my foundation and drainage pipes..are the roots invasive? I see many houses with Musa right next to them....would the pups completely overtake the house/drain pipes, or stay pretty contained as per root ball?

    What do you think? I hope it is ok, as it would look great in that spot, but I don't want the risk of it clogging my drain pipes---you know how wet the cost of BC is! I need my drain pipes to be clear!!!!!

    Cheers,
     
  6. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    These "basjoo" bananas aren't especially deep rooted. They can get a dense root mass with many off-sets in a fairly short span of time. Plant this well away from your foundation / house to enjoy it's full grandeur.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  7. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    Thanks! That is pretty much what I thought.....I was always baffled when seeing them so close to people's houses...

    I shall plant it in a special spot with much room to grow! Thank you so much for the advice!
     
  8. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hey ... good luck!

    Cheers, LPN (Barrie).
     
  9. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    Just wondering.........how does Musa do with a row of cedar hedges within feet? My neighbours planted baby cedars about 4 feet from where the musa will go (although there will be plenty of sun and space for the trunk, leaves to grow). I am wondering more about the interaction of the soil, as I have heard that cedar changes pH of the soil to quite acidic.....will this damage the musa nearby?

    Any info on surrounding soil? I have looked, but nothing out there about the effects of surrounding plants and soil changes....
    thanks
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Soil is liable to be acidic already. Banana is a big creeping herbaceous perennial, with a rootstock on or near the surface. Hedge growing large and filling its planting area with the sodlike mat of roots western redcedar produces bound to affect it at some point. Maybe a root barrier should be considered. Or just plunge a spade between the two of them once or twice per year - if there are no buried utilities there.
     
  11. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    Thanks! Glad you mentioned the root barrier as we were considering doing this (have some spare bamboo barrier hanging around and were planning to use that). Our back yard is quite the micr-climate with lots of what the banana will need....we do have to plant it in the ground though, as it is outgrowing it's container and we only have a couple of spots left to choose from! Though the hedges will be on the one side, beyond the fence, it will have the rest of the open back yard to grow in!
    thanks,
     

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