Moss in flower beds

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Ccleland, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. Ccleland

    Ccleland Member

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    Location:
    Vancouver
    I have just moved to a new garden with a significant moss problem in the flower beds. Other than scraping it off does anyone know of an eco-friendly product I could use? I am also wondering whether I should compost the scraped off moss.
     
  2. tiger_lily

    tiger_lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Burnaby, BC
    I have lots of different mosses in my garden. Sometimes I pull it. Other times I try to leave it there - it adds some pretty textures and colours to the garden. I know that's not what you were hoping for, but I couldn't bear to think of using a "product" on it.
     
  3. marlened

    marlened Member

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    Location:
    Oakland
    Why would you want to remove it? Moss is great! But yes you can compost it!
     
  4. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    You can increase the PH with a sulfate or deprive it of water. I have used rock salt the kind used for melting ice it is quite effective but could have an effect on the soil. The problem with moss is you have to get rid of it before it spreads more spores. Increasing the PH of the soil with lime is the best way of preventing it from coming back.
    I have a moss garden on the north side of my house where I plant some acid loving plants in a natural setting with some indigenous plants. The moss is fairly easy to weed as most weeds roots don't make it through the moss to get a good hold.
     
  5. Freyja

    Freyja Active Member

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    Location:
    Surrey, BC, Canada
    Just a caution about adding lime -- I too have lots and lots of moss, but my recent soil test (from a lab) indicated my ph was 7.0 (neutral). If I had gone ahead and limed, this would have made my soil more alkaline, not good at all for my rhodos or my grass.

    It seems that moss lives here in the West Coast regardless of acidity in soil. I'd recommend a soil test before putting lime on (even though it is a standard lawn maintenance service seemingly recommended by everyone here on the West Coast). I just assumed my soil was acidic and was surprised by the soil test results.
     
  6. davemossbuster

    davemossbuster Member

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    Location:
    Clear Lake IA
    We make a product called Moss Buster, an all natural essential oil extract from a plant that desiccates moss and does not harm root bearing plants. We are currently working with nurseries in the NW with much success. Visit www.mossbuster.com
     

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