more mysteries

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by lainyg, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    abbotsford, BC
    Thanks for your help with my previous mystery plant post. I'm not certain I have them all right yet but time will tell.

    Does anyone recognize these? I've tried searching on line and checked weed websites but find it difficult to make any id. Those websites don't help much when you don't know what you're looking for!

    #1 noticed these growing in a bed next to the house a few weeks ago. They range between 8" & 18" tall. We pulled a small one and the roots are quite small.

    2012-06-10_14-33-51_744.jpg 2012-06-10_14-34-01_667.jpg 2012-06-10_15-59-15_587.jpg

    #2 has been around for a couple of months and keeps getting taller!
    2012-06-10_14-43-42_821.jpg 2012-06-10_14-43-15_830.jpg

    #3 has a tag next to it that says "savory" but I don't think this is it. The leaves don't smell like an herb.
    2012-06-10_14-34-41_865.jpg 2012-06-10_14-35-00_159.jpg 2012-06-10_14-35-16_449.jpg

    Thanks for your help!
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2012
  2. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,040
    Likes Received:
    186
    Location:
    Kiev, Ukraine
    1 - Papaver somniferum
    2 - Dipsacus sp.
     
  3. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver Island, BC, Canada, Zone 7
    I would just like to add that poppies do not like to be moved, and they reseed themselves easily. If you don't like where they are, your best bet is to plant from seed next year someplace else.
     
  4. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    abbotsford, BC
    Thanks!

    I'll let the poppies grow where they are for now. Glad it's not a weed! Hubby wanted to pull them (he got one of them!) but I asked him to wait until I found out what they are. :)

    I'm so glad I asked about #2! We have a large dead one in the back (we cut a second one down) and I was wondering what the heck it was. I couldn't see anything that looked like it growing and never would have guessed that this was it! I haven't been able to find any really good pictures but will let it grow for now.

    Any ideas on #3?
     
  5. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    #3 may be a young foxglove.
     
  6. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    abbotsford, BC
    Thank you, but I don't think so...it doesn't resemble any of my foxgloves which are now all about 5' tall and in bloom.
     
  7. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,215
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    It look lovely when it blooms. Your plant looks quite vigorous and should bloom eventually. And when it dries, it can stay forever in a vase as a reminder of the horror of handling it with bare hands. :)
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,746
    Likes Received:
    578
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Looks quite like Digitalis purpurea to me also.
     
  9. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    abbotsford, BC
    Interesting. I waited several weeks for the others to grow before I knew for sure. I wonder why this one is so far behind the others? Some of them are only a few feet away, so basically the same conditions and a month ago they were at least 2' tall with the bud starting out of the top. I even have some growing beneath some climbing roses and they're poking out through the top so I don't think the large rose this is next to would be affecting it. I guess we'll wait and see.
     
  10. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    abbotsford, BC
    Ah, but I wear gloves ;) My real estate agent thought it would be a neat idea to spray paint the dried blooms and put them in a vase. I have at least 3 or 4 of these so might see if she wants one. :)
     
  11. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,128
    Likes Received:
    357
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    That's normal for biennials like Foxglove. The ones in the pics above are first-year; the ones in flower are second-year.
     
  12. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    abbotsford, BC
    Oh my...how many of you are muttering "what a noob"? Thank you for the explanation! I had no idea :)
     
  13. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    Lainyg
    Not your fault at all. I should have been clearer. Digitalis purpurea (yes Ron) - Fox glove are biennials. The first year you have the lovely little rossette of leaves and flowers the 2nd yr. ;)) barb
     
  14. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    abbotsford, BC
    But what if it's one of these? If I'm right, it's still a foxglove, but would it still be a digitalis purpurea? ;)
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    In my experience purpurea tends to indicate purplish color. So maybe the white one will be digitalis alba. Yup it is. Google digitalis alba and see the many kinds.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2012
  16. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    abbotsford, BC
    Lol...thanks to wikipedia I actually knew the name and meaning before Ron B mentioned it. I was just being a little cheeky!

    Funny little story: yestarday I was talking to hubby about our digitalis purpurea, the philadelphus, whether or not our strange horn was an aroid or arisaema...basically rattling off every name I've learned so far, and he said "if I ever hear you talk like that again this house goes on the market!". He was kidding, of course, but it was pretty funny at the time! :)
     
  17. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    Keep learning the botanical names. How many times have you heard of "Texas Blue Bonnets" and expected something like an English blue bell, wild hyacinth. What are Texas blue bonnets? A Lupine. That is just a little example of why the botanical names are so important.
     
  18. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,910
    Likes Received:
    265
    Location:
    PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND.UK
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 12, 2012
  19. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    Thanks SS. So in this case the "purpurea" has become part of the botanical name and the "alba' is a color indicator?
     
  20. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,128
    Likes Received:
    357
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Digitalis purpurea is a species; the wild plants almost invariably have puple flowers. In gardens, white-flowered mutations lacking the normal purple pigments have been selected and propagated, because some people (not me!!) think they look nicer than the natural purple ones. These were originally named Digitalis purpurea var. alba, but more accurately, they are the cultivar group Digitalis purpurea Alba Group, since they are human-made selections, not a natural botanical variety.
     
  21. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    After sitting through morning discussion on Hybridizing Iris, that actually makes sence. Thanks
     

Share This Page