Money tree questions

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Dontaskmehow, May 22, 2022.

  1. Dontaskmehow

    Dontaskmehow New Member

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    Hi! New here! I have a money tree that stretched due to insufficient light for a few years. Since switching it to a sunny spot in my new home it’s doing really great! I’m just a little concerned about it’s trunk. I’m trying to do everything I can to keep it healthy because I’m so happy with it’s recovery. I’ll attach photos but is it okay for the trunks to look wet even though they are not soft or squishy. I don’t water it too frequently. Maybe once a week or once every two weeks, depending on soil moisture.

    Also, should I just clip off the new growth to encourage it to sprout leaves lower down the stem? The thin stems are having a hard time supporting the bushy tops now and I’d like to see it fill in a bit.

    Thank you!

    Better picture of the “wet” looking trunks.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 27, 2022
  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Welcome to the Forums.

    Here's another option: Stake the trunks and allow the tops to continue to grow; the foliage will produce nutrients which will allow the trees to strengthen their lower stem. Once the trees have gained enough height and have overgrown the interior space, air layer the tops to create new plants then allow the mother plants to grow back from much shortened trunks.

    The 'wet' areas are probably that way because of the moisture being wicked up from the soil. This, over time, leaves a stain from the minerals left behind even after the moisture has evaporated.
     
  3. Dontaskmehow

    Dontaskmehow New Member

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    Okay great! Thank you for the guidance. After I eventually air layer, if I cut the stem where the new roots are, new leaves will grow from the cut stem on original plant?

    Thanks again! I appreciate the help
     
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Yes, that is the plan. By the time the tops are ready to be propagated, the lower stems would have increased in girth so that they would be able to support the new growth without the need of stakes. After removal of the tops, prune back the stems to the desired height at a point just above a node.

    Reference: Plant Propagation by Layering | NC State Extension Publications. In this case, use the method given for dicots.
     

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