Identification: Mold Growth on Cedar Mulch - Help!

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Turning Point, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. Turning Point

    Turning Point Member

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    Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    I have pancake sized growths appearing on top of cedar mulch that was put down about two months ago. They are grey/white on the surface, with black spores inside and around the edges. They seem to be growing on top of the mulch and speading at a rate of a couple of inches in diameter per day in very dry weather.

    Within inches of the white "pancakes" there are much smaller, irregular shaped, yellow growths. These are sticky and shiney and are pentetrating the mulch about an inch. The yellow ones are only about the size of a quarter, but doubling in size every day.

    One evergreen shrub has been overtaken thus far, but many plants are close. I'm not sure what to do.

    When I touch the "pancakes" the spores puff out like very fine dust. Should I wet the growths down with water before trying to remove them? or will that just wash the spores into the ground? spray with bleach? use powered sulfur? mix the sulfur power into a liquid and then spray the growths and then remove them?

    The beds are new this year... no old growth underneath. The garden are was formerly an ashplat parking lot...asphalt was removed, gravel dug out, beds dug out and refilled with soil. Cribs built and then filled with top soil. Fresh gravel was brought in to create pathways between the crib planters. I've planted 691 plants...I do not want to lose them!

    YIPES!

    Please Help!
     
  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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  3. Turning Point

    Turning Point Member

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    Mycorob,
    Thank you... the photos are a true dipiction of what is in my garden. The answer page is however, distressing. Basically the fungus expert is saying that there is nothing that can be done so "enjoy" this new growth.

    Well...as interesting as these colonies are, they are taking over and killing plants. Mostly euyonoums(sp?) shrubs. This is not something that I find enjoyable!

    Any other suggestions?
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    does anyone know if fungicides work on the slime molds from the kingdom Protista??
     
  5. Turning Point

    Turning Point Member

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    MycoRob,
    Your question sounds like something that would arise if "Day of the Triffids" met "Dungeons and Dragons"!
    Not a helpful reply, but I thought it funny!

    I carefully removed all of the fungus/mold and the mulch, soil and plants that may have come in contact with it. Thus far, no new occurances and still no rain - very dry here right now (unusually so). Water restrictions are on and thus I'm going to lose some trees...such is nature.

    J
     
  6. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    "The best way to get rid of a slime mold is to break itup and dry it out. Rake up and dispose of slime molds on bark mulch. For slime molds on turf, mow the lawn, and rake up the thatch. Alternatively, you may want to enjoy a slime mold if youfind one in your yard. These complex organisms are fascinating to observe and can be“captured” and grown indoors as a science project. "

    from http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:...sticide+"slime+mold"&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=3

    and there you have it.
     

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