Identification: Mis-shapen 'Akebono'?

Discussion in 'Ornamental Cherries' started by Ron B, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Renfrew-Collingwood

    It's transplanting shock. If sufficiently damaged full recovery may never occur. Down here large balled-in-burlap tree stock is often allowed to dry out between the production field and the final resting place. This is a great way to stunt subsequent top growth, including the growth of flowers.

    Otherwise, if handled successfully these will resume normal top growth after the roots grow back out the first fall after planting.
     
  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I posted one of these locations in its neighbourhood and Ron B replied, so I'm going to copy his reply to this thread; that means it's appearing before this posting, which makes the sequence pretty strange. Maybe this should all go in the Growing Ornamental Cherries forum?

    There are three young trees across the street from a row of old 'Akebono'. The middle one looks just like young 'Akebono' usually look and is in full bloom, just like the older trees. But these two trees are just coming into bloom. The blossoms look like 'Akebono' to me. The tree does not, and I questioned whether it could be, with the blossoming time so different from every other 'Akebono' in the city. See Ron's reply.
    20100318_WellingtonManor_Akebono_Cutler_DSC05514.jpg 20100318_WellingtonManor_Akebono_Cutler_DSC05515.jpg 20100318_WellingtonManor_Akebono_Cutler_DSC05518.jpg 20100318_WellingtonManor_Akebono_Cutler_DSC05525.jpg

    Here's a tree we saw on David Tracey's walk last year. He questioned whether this could be 'Akebono', as it has such a vertical habit, and he said that the tree is permanently shaped this way now. It is in bloom now, and a passerby urged me to photograph it as it's so thickly covered in blossoms (compared with the hill cherries or whatever they are nearby).
    20100318_48thRaleigh_Akebono_Cutler_DSC05564.jpg 20100318_48thRaleigh_Akebono_Cutler_DSC05567.jpg 20100318_48thRaleigh_Akebono_Cutler_DSC05571.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    On the earlier recent version of this thread older 'Akebono' shown can be seen to have quite similar vase-like centers inside their now mostly broad and horizontal crowns - indicating these particular specimens did also start out with an erect habit, that was kept for some years.
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I think this is the photo to which Ron was referring.
     

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  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Visualize these veterans before the mature habit with the horizontal branches developed, and you have nearly the same shape as the small ones.

    Maybe these particular new ones are also grafted onto sweet cherry, this imparting a vigor or other influence which produces more upright growth than other 'Akebono' propagated by other means.

    Or it is just a function of how well specific individuals have done in their early years, more vigorous specimens being more erect - whether that vigor is imparted by rootstock used or not.
     

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