Microclimate aside...are new Zone maps better?

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by kia796, Feb 18, 2007.

  1. kia796

    kia796 Active Member

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    Location:
    North Okanagan, Canada
    We'd been on dial-up for years; then this Fall it was available (apparently due to lots of complaints). High speed is a completely different experience which then, of course, leads to a new computer, and wonderful add-ons like DVD burners and "must haves". LOL.

    I still think for this project to really take off, the Feds have to do more than ask for submissions on their website. Many gov't sites--while well-designed--are boring, so how many people see it?
    It might be that gov't won't charge Botanical Gardens...could even lead to an interactive display for those looking for new ways to attract the public. It could get young folks more interested.
     
  2. hortfreak

    hortfreak Active Member Maple Society

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    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
    There have been many sources, such as Master Gardeners and horticultural societies, that have been asked to solicit participation from their members. I have been asked by at least five different sources. Unfortunately, one of the criteria is that plants must have been in the ground for a minimum of 3 years. I moved here just over 3 years ago, but for a variety of reasons, I have only had plants in the ground for the last 2 summers. I was very disappointed as I would very much have liked to have participated. Hopefully it will be an ongoing project, and I will be able to participate at some point.
     
  3. kia796

    kia796 Active Member

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    By this time next year, you'll have met the criteria. Excellent that MG and societies are involved. You could use this coming season to take photos of all your plants, which would make your submission even more valuable. Good for you to get involved.
     
  4. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Courtenay, Vancouver Island
    If the criteria for info is based on 3 years, there's sure to be some unusual input. Here in my 8b garden I can overwinter a 10a plant in some winters, ceratinly a 9a or 9b plant. I think looking at established natural flora and their requirements, gives a solid basis for the introduced plant material.
    Having said that, plant provenance plays a roll as well. Some genus are more prone to this than others. Some plants draw a solid line in the sand, while others are dependant on finding specimen at the limits of their growing range.
    We enthustiasts on the Pacific coast are always aware of this and seek the primo seed, root stock or plant material to give us a fighting chance.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  5. hortfreak

    hortfreak Active Member Maple Society

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    Location:
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    I really don't remember the time frame for this project, if in fact there is a definite time period, which I recall there was originally. The idea, of course, for covering a number of years is to establish a "standard"---weed out (so to speak) the extraordinary years, be that cold or hot, extra dry or wet, thus giving us reasonable expectations, which, of course, is all this can do. LPN, you are bang on when you say that some genera are more prone to the variances than others. Hopefully, the report will somehow impart this information as it is most important. I trust that when all is said and done, purchasing plants will be much easier and our selections infinitely more reliable than they have been up until now.

    I regularly photograph my gardens, including close-ups, for informational reasons. It is an excellent way to assess the health of your plants from year to year. Memories are faulty, so this gives me a good, accurate record to rely on. I suspect, as we are affected more and more by climate change, this may become even more important in the future. As an added bonus, it points out the faults in the gardens and allows me to come up with changes, additions or whatever during the long winter months.
     

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