Maple Recommendations

Discussion in 'Maples' started by maplesandpaws, Jun 7, 2016.

  1. maplesandpaws

    maplesandpaws Active Member

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    This will be interesting... )
    Name two - only two - of your favorite maple cultivars that you think I absolutely can't be without in my collection, and why. I'm in 7b, northern Alabama. Thanks!!
    Currently, I have:
    Buergerianum: Hana chiru sato, species
    Japonicum: Abby's Weeping, Giant Moon
    Sieboldianum: Kumoi nishiki
    Dissectum: English Lace, Filigree, Hana matoi, Judith Ann, Red Dragon, Seiryu, Vifidis
    Linearlobum: Aekan Ie's, Tom, Villa Taranto
    Palmatum: Anne Irene, Ariadne, Bihou, Jade Dragon, Kuro hime, Kurenai jishi, Lima Gold, Matthew, Mikawa nishiki, Mimaye, Murakumo, Olsen's Frosted Strawberry, Peve Starfish, Ryusen, Sherwood Elfin, Shigi no hoshi, Shinju, Taro yama, Tequila Sunset, Ueno yama, Wild Fire
     
  2. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    Hmm,well can't see a golden maplle there so I'll say AS Jordan,absolutely glows in sun especially with those large leaves...and I think every enthusiast has to have Mikawa Yatsubusa...nothing unusual but starts the ball rolloing :)
    oh just checked out Mikawa Nishiki incase it's similar..never heard of it before,looks quite nice.
     
  3. bub72ck

    bub72ck Active Member

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    Andrea I responded on Facebook today to your same question but this afternoon I thought about Beni Hoshi as a nice suggestion as well. It has a large variety of color from bright reds and pinks to dark reds and some green undertones. I have been really pleased with it's shape as well.
     
  4. JT1

    JT1 Contributor

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    Get red filigree lace for the delicate deep red foliage and its ability to hold the color in shade all season long.
     
  5. Geezer840

    Geezer840 Active Member 10 Years

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    Andrea, you really didn't give any guidance regarding size or time. I'm finding that my favorite tree is a Baldsmith that I've had in the ground for 9 years and it was probably a 1.5" caliper when I planted it. The shape of the tree makes it especially attractive in winter and keeping it pruned so the structure is visible in the rest of the year make it my #1 pick. As a second pick I debated between two small trees, a Hupp's Dwarf and a Kurenai jishi. Aside from the green versus red color, I see these two as quite similar in growth pattern and leaf structure. I think the Hupp's might be a miniature Mikawa Yatsubusa and noted you don't have one of those so I guess that will have to be my #2 pick.
    Will you let us know how many of the suggested trees you end up with?
    Oh, if you don't want to wait for a Baldsmith to get to a mature size you might want to get a Hupp's Dwarf (but I'm sticking with my limit of just two suggestions).
     
  6. maplesmagpie

    maplesmagpie Active Member

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    I responded on facebook, too, but I'll repeat it here: Moonrise and Iijima sunago. Their colors and color changes are unlike any JMs I have or know of, both handle sun well, and I find myself walking out at least a few times a week to see them up close. I also like that their colors are different but not garish-- they won't visually overtake a landscape, but they'll definitely add a pleasing complexity.
     
  7. emery

    emery Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Hi Andrea,

    Two is so hard! Especially when I'm not sure about the sun and heat aspect.

    Still I see you don't have japonicum 'Aconitifolium'. You would be hard pressed to find any maple with better fall colours, all reds and yellows mixed, it is spectacular. Spring foliage is lovely and in early summer it is graced with bright red samaras. I think it's pretty tough, certainly for cold but also for sun. I saw a very large one growing in Switzerland once.

    For a second maple I'll propose a snakebark, since you don't have one: George Forrest's Maple, A. pectinatum ssp forrestii. Great year round interest. Bark in winter is yellow striped with orand and white before turning green with sap in spring. Spring growth is bright green and the bud scales elongate and peel back, the whole tree is a contrast in these two colours. New summer growth is a bright rich red, in July it looks dotted with brilliant butterflies. Finally fall colour is a striking mixture of yellow, red, ochres and dark greens, all very pastel and remarkable among the other maples.

    Found a couple of pics from last year: leafing out; sap rising in late winter; beginning of fall colour.

    I'll have to find your FB thread, haven't had much time to spend there recently.

    -E
     

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  8. maplesandpaws

    maplesandpaws Active Member

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    No restrictions on size, time :) You're the second one to give a glowing review of Baldsmith... I may just have to pick this one up :) I already have Kurenai jishi, just this spring, and quite like it so far. I think you're also the second person to suggest Hupp's Dwarf, so that may be one I need to look into as well.

    I know, ONLY two, right? lol Definitely hot and humid here, heat is a bit less extreme than Kansas - longer-lasting though - and more humid, though not excessively so.

    As you can see, I only have a couple japonicums currently (I had a Green Cascade back in Kansas), but they are growing on me - Emmett's Pumpkin is on the to-buy list for a featured spot right by the front door, but I may have to consider Aconitifolium as another option. Having that kind of color in the front would be very eye-catching.

    The snakebark sounds very cool, I'm definitely going to look into that one! What's the typical growth rate/habit/size on that one? Sun tolerance? Going back to the maple slated for the front entry, our house is red brick, so that immediately rules out the red-leafed uprights (or Nuresagi would have been the winner) since they'll disappear into the house; I though Bihou would be great there, and the apricot bark would provide great winter interest, but the location gets full sun from about noon to 6pm, and I know Bihou can't take that kind of exposure. This might be a nice alternative somewhere in the front yard - in tandem with a coral bark maybe - if it can take the sun.

    My facebook post is in the Japanese Maples and Conifers group if you're looking :)
     
  9. maplesandpaws

    maplesandpaws Active Member

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    I'll have to look into that then; so many of the reds wash out once mid-summer and the heat set in. Thus far, the only red I personally have experience with that holds the color through the heat AND in shade is Nuresagi. The foliage texture on this one, is it fairly fine/delicate? What about hardiness, or is it more on the fickle side like some can be?
     
  10. emery

    emery Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    I guess the thing with 'Emmett's' is that while it has really fabulous fall colour, it doesn't do much during the rest of the year. Really great, unique FC though.

    forrestii makes a small tree, with a spreading upright habit. I don't really know how it would do in your sun; I've got it in full sun, but these snakebarks do tend to be understory trees and sometimes have bark problems. I think forrestii is a bit better than some of them, but the bark is thin and so can burn in sun or wind, and I do see some pseudomonas though not nearly as much as on the red barked palmatums.

    I expect Matt or Tim Nichols could tell you how it would handle the southern sun.

    cheers,

    -E
     

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