Magnolia 'Vulcan'

Discussion in 'Magnoliaceae' started by arnaut, May 29, 2007.

  1. arnaut

    arnaut Active Member

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    Location:
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    Magnolia 'Vulcan'
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  3. arnaut

    arnaut Active Member

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    Photo 1 Location: Eeklo, Belgium
    Photo 2 Location: Leende, The Netherlands
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    What each specimen looks like is primarily what is pertinent to its identification being resolved, except where a record search might provide hints as to how the wrong names got on them. My 'Vulcan' is grafted, possibly one or both of these is even an unnamed seedling that replaced 'Vulcan' grafted onto them.
     
  5. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The problem at times with the Google images
    is that it requires us to know what the particular
    flower is supposed to look like. Sometimes we
    have to know what the parents of the hybrid look
    like as well and we can see both in the Duncan
    & Davies photo that shows the Lanarth parentage
    in the center of the flower and the truer basic
    color for this Magnolia. From the Vulcan I've
    seen from the first imports to come into the US
    it is not out of bounds for the young trees to
    have color as depicted in these photos with
    reservation in the interior color of the tepals..
    As the trees age they should get better color
    and some of the hybrid mollicomata forms
    can indeed look like the photo on the right.
    I like the fact that in both photos it was later
    told where the plants are located. I'd like to
    see more of that as we sometimes incorrectly
    assume the photos are of the same plant
    owned by the person that posted the photos.
    If the plants are not ours we should make
    that designation as a courtesy.

    It is not a surprise to me that the photos of
    this particular Magnolia appear shaded in
    the tepal considering where the photos
    came from. Vulcan takes a while to
    achieve its truer colors anyway and the
    typical color can change on us from year to
    year depending on our climate and culture.

    Jim
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Paler-than-usual examples of 'Vulcan' - such as shown in Google photos linked to - still have a more even, different style of pigmentation. Two specimens in question are of the white base color, flushed or stained purple type rather than a solid base color that is partly faded or bleached-looking. Google pictures also show different flower shape of 'Vulcan'.

    My specimen is now perhaps 20' tall and has never had red flowers, yet they have been ~uniformly colored and of the same shape as shown by Google.

    A 'Spectrum' at the Seattle arboretum did bloom medium or even light pink (instead of reddish purple) for some years and was removed. Leaf and flower shape were correct for this cultivar, however, appearing to show that it was, in fact a true-to-name plant not behaving true-to-type.
     
  7. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I am not thrilled with the white shading
    on the outside of the tepal but I have seen
    it before on a few young plants. What is
    not right is the interior tepal color for it
    to be Vulcan.

    I am not criticizing you and wouldn't
    anyway for posting the link to the
    Google photos but I can argue that
    many Magnolias in that host site are
    touted as being a specific name that
    they are not, even from RHS affiliate
    nurseries. I think we need to specify
    which photo is closer to being right
    and as for the D&D photo, this is the
    nursery that the original plants for
    Vulcan were imported from into the
    US. These plants did not come in
    directly into various arboretums and
    botanical gardens either, the Jury
    hybrid plants came to very select
    nurseries first with a substantial
    dollar amount order minimum for
    all of the plants imported in.

    The D&D color catalog first showed
    a whole lot richer colored flower than
    the online photo shows I might add,
    which caused a few people to check
    around in New Zealand and in one
    location in Europe in particular, asking
    the question, is the flower a rose-red
    and later we found that it is not from
    the plants that came here after waiting
    a few years for them to bloom, as none
    of the original plants came in in bud.

    A digital photo taken even a few minutes
    apart can make the plant appear darker
    or lighter in color which can give the false
    impression that the outside of the tepal is
    shaded when it may not be. I had that
    happen with some photos I've taken of
    our Black Tulip.

    Jim
     
  8. arnaut

    arnaut Active Member

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  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Some here produce the red flowers, so it is not climate.
     
  10. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Below is the link to the Duncan & Davies
    web site showing the color of their Vulcan.
    Two things we have to take note of that
    Vulcan was not available for import when
    Star Wars, Iolanthe, Athene and Apollo
    first came in. The other is that Duncan &
    Davies initially had exclusive rights to sell
    Vulcan wholesale. We all got our Vulcan
    directly or indirectly from them in some
    way.

    Magnolias: spectacular flowering trees, shrubs - hybrids, new releases

    Red or is it, or are we hoping we are
    seeing red?

    Two photos taken on March 5, 2007
    shows how the same Magnolia can
    appear slightly different in color
    in a matter of seconds. Bird 2 is in
    the background. The misses owns
    Bird 1, both are "hybirds" (hybrids)
    as we affectionately call our fleet.

    Jim
     

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  11. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

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    My plant is from Fairweather. It had paler blooms the first few years. Here are the flower buds 4/07.
     

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  12. Kilack

    Kilack Member

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    Hello People,

    I am very interested in getting a Magnolia planted in my front garden and I think I have narrowed my decision down to between the vulcan and dedunata - forrest's pink.

    I went to a public garden that had a 10 year old vulcan and also it had Forrest's pink. The flowers on forrest's pink were stunning, unfortunately the vulcan wasn't flowering. I have seen photos of the vulcan flowers and they do look spectacular however.

    The one thing I didn't really like was the shape of the vulcan tree compared to forrest's pink. This vulcan was very narrow, one main trunk and the branches coming off the trunk were almost vertical also. Forrest's pink and also the starwars magnolia tree there were a really nice roundy shape.

    I am wondering if this is the standard shape for vulcans or if this was just a bad specimen?

    I have tried to find photos on the internet of vulcan trees but can't find any except of baby trees, all the photos are just of flowers.

    If anyone can give me information on what their trees look like and possibly some photos that would be really appreciated!

    Thanks in advance
     
  13. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    'Forrest's Pink' has one or two noteworty features but produces same general impression as some saucer magnolias. It also resembles the Sprenger magnolia, if trying to get the appearance of that species a more thrilling color form such as the famous 'Diva' would seem to be a better choice. 'Vulcan' is a facsimile of the amazing and unique 'Lanarth' Campbell magnolia, with flowers sometimes almost as striking on a shrubbier tree that blooms young. (Actually the tendency of 'Vulcan' to appear red could be seen as making its flowers MORE arresting than those of 'Lanarth', which are "cyclamen purple" when showing characteristic pigmentation).
     
  14. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

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    Kilack,

    My Vulcan is somewhat broad and shrubby. I once saw an older plant and it was also shrubby maybe even rangy. But it was loaded with those great looking colorful buds.

    You might ask about Vulcan size and shape over here. Magnolia heavies haunt this group.

    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/magnolia/


    gil
     

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