Magnolia Tree. Will it survive? (pics)

Discussion in 'Magnoliaceae' started by lily, Jan 9, 2008.

  1. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    When they moved my new mobile home to its pad, they had to remove part of this tree growing on my front lawn. I was told it was a magnolia tree. I'm wondering if it will ever grow back again? Are there different kinds of magnolia trees? I wonder what it would look like in full bloom. Is there anything I can do to help it grow? I've posted some pics in case it will help. Thanks again for helping me.
    Lily
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2008
  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    removed 'part' of the tree? I would say that they removed pretty much all of it besides the roots. It looks like it is trying to grow back, have patience and you might get lucky...
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    If not on its own roots the sprouts may be a different kind. Remove the grass from around it in a circle several feet across and topdress with compost or mulch.

    Or dig it out and plant something that hasn't been severely damaged.
     
  4. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Thank you both Paul and Ron for your help.
    Okay, I think I'll give this one some careful thought, before I give in to planting something else. It broke my heart to see what had happened to it. Being the mother I am, I'm leaning more towards trying to nurture it back.
    Lily
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Maybe you should replace it with a lily magnolia.
     
  6. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Ron...Okay, well I didn't know what a lily magnolia was until I just Googled it. I found Star and Saucer Magnolias. I loved the saucer magnolia. Would you recommend a bush or a tree for my small front lawn in front of my mobile home? Thanks for helping me and I love your idea.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  8. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Personally I like the sieboldii and wilsonii magnolias. :)
     
  9. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi Jimmy,
    I googled the sieboldii and wilsonii magnolias and I they are indeed beautiful.
     
  10. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    Spring-flowering Asian magnolias thrive in the PNW, so it's well worth planting even a baby. In the southeast US, erratic cold snaps have a remarkable talent for turning the flowers into brown mush.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    We get frost damage here, too. Another thing that happens is they seem to get bleached by sunshine. Perfect weather for them may be unusual here. Such plants appear to come from climates with clearly defined, mostly predictable seasons. Variable weather is apparently not so usual as in North America. F. Kingdon-Ward wrote of walking through expanses of dead rhododendrons on one trip because for once, the summer rains didn't come.

    Part of the idea of the Kosar and De Vos hybrids was to get some of the attributes of the star magnolia on a shrub that flowered later, when it was less frosty.
     

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