Identification: Looks like Lactarius deliciosus or rubrilacteus

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by WoodWitch, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. WoodWitch

    WoodWitch Member

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    I have been seeing these mushrooms for years yet have not found anything like them in the id guides besides the above mentioned species. Visually they pass but they don't bleed latex and the spore print is a cinnamon colour not buff or pale yellow. Any ideas out there? I live in the northern interior of B.C. and find the guides don't reflect the diversity or expression of individual types of plant or fungi. I haven't tasted these mushrooms either but they smell pleasant. Still....
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 6, 2010
  2. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi Woodwitch,

    A rusty red spore colour could mean that they are in the Cortinarius genus, a large and diverse group of mushrooms that turn up very frequently in B.C. Regardless, with a spore colour of that general shade, they are definitely not Lactarius.

    If you have a specimen handy, take a close look at the cap edges and see if you can see the cobwebby remnants of a cortina attached to the cap. That would be another character for Cortinarius.

    FYI, most Cortinarius species are not considered edible, and several are poisonous. You can taste them, but do spit it out after.

    Please do post a photo if you can.

    cheers
    frog
     
  3. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    What specifically is it growing on? i have some other guesses if you say wood.
     
  4. WoodWitch

    WoodWitch Member

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    They grow with the wild grass we have around here. I've found them where they could be growing from underground wood but not actually out of wood like you would see an oyster mushroom. They come up both single and in small groups.
     
  5. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    interesting. I think our consensus is that we need a photo.
     
  6. WoodWitch

    WoodWitch Member

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    Sorry Frog, I didn't see your note till I posted the last reply to MycoRob. There is no sign of a veil. The edges are smooth and clean. I don't have a photo right now but the pictures in "North American Mushrooms" by Dr. Orson Miller Jr. and Hope Miller of the above mentioned mushrooms could be practically identical if you put the two together. The stem is hollow, it stains green on the gills, stem and top (looking down on the mushroom). I think this is an age thing as the smaller ones are mostly a pale orange. There is a darker orange line of flesh just before the gills (when cut vertically). I checked the Cortinarius section out and see two that are similar in shape and colour of spore but nothing else fits.
     
  7. WoodWitch

    WoodWitch Member

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    Here are some photos of the ones I kept. Unfortunately I've already cut the end off. Maybe these will help.
     

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  8. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    yes, that is a Lactarius! First, I'll say that we get that in the mountain west and call it Lactarius rubrilacteus, even though we know it probably isn't. Second, and everyone on this board who sees my posts knows this - i'm not the taxonomy police. However, we folks in North American can start calling L. deliciosus (drum roll please) ---> L. deterrimus.
     
  9. WoodWitch

    WoodWitch Member

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    So why no latex when its cut? And the spore colour is too dark. Maybe we just grow them different in this part of the province?
     
  10. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Probably the mushroom is too dry. I've had Lactarii refuse to bleed for me before.
    Lactarius spore colour is white/pale; it is probably the dried latex exudate that gave you that red/cinnamon colour.

    Ack! :-)

    cheers,
    frog
     
  11. WoodWitch

    WoodWitch Member

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    Brilliant! Thankyou so much for your help. I've looked it up and am now trying another fresh cap to check the print again. I suspect our extremely dry summer may effect how these milk caps express themselves. I'm thinking a little taste is in order...
     

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