Looking for indoor dwarf mango trees in pot

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by sallytsong, Jan 28, 2014.

  1. sallytsong

    sallytsong New Member

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    Hello everyone, I am so interested in planting a dwarf mango tree in my house this year. I live in St. Catharines, Ontario, which is a kind of warm place compare to other cities in Ontario.

    However, I don't know where to buy the tree? Do I need to grow it starting with the seed? Is there any place sell small dwarf tree in Ontario?

    Looking forward your reply!
     
  2. Frazrking

    Frazrking Member

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    Richmond
    Hello Sally,
    Your in luck, I just joined to see if anyone else has experience with dwarf mango trees... came across your post and do have some info that might help you out.
    I have also been looking for dwarf mango trees and did quite a bit of research on where i could obtain them.
    Here is the link where I ordered the mango trees, I ordered the Mallika and Nam Doc Mai mango trees:
    http://www.tropicalfruitnursery.com/mango/mallika-mango.shtml
    Since I had to order from the United states, I contacted CFIA To find out what is required to bring it to Vancouver. I got some information from this site:
    http://www.inspection.gc.ca/plants/plant-protection/imports/primer/eng/1324568450671/1324569734910
    I also called them to find out for sure...here is the telephone number to call: 1-800-442-2342, I was told I need a phytosanitary certificate which would cost 75$
    I hope this information will help you out. My order is going to ship at the start of spring as the trees would not survive a winter shipment. The toughest part will be at the border I believe..even if everything is done by the book.
    Good luck
     
  3. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    Hi,
    Sorry to disappoint but I have been trying for years to bring in tropical fruit trees without luck. The problem with ordering out of the states is that I have not found any reputable nursery that WILL ship to Canada, even those that say they will on their website; I have been told "they don't do it any more" because the phyto certification has to be issued by the shipper/nursery and so it is "too much paperwork".
    Also, a good portion of fruit trees arriving at the border never make it across - Canada has some of the toughest plant import regulations you will find.
    FYI, I have looked into this nursery in the past and hopefully they have changed their policies and done the paperwork properly.

    Try contacting Flora Exotic - http://www.floraexotica.ca/Fruit.htm - out of Montreal.
    He has mangos listed on his website. I have dealt with Perry a few times in the last couple of years and have never been disappointed by his plants.....it would also be cheaper for you regarding shipping than it is for me :)

    As for the ones heading to Richmond (also applicable to Ontario)
    As per AIRS (the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Automated Import Reference System), this is what you need to import mango trees:

    Import Details for Requirement : 49566 Version : 21

    HS Description : 060220
    06Live trees and other plants; bulbs, roots and the like; cut flowers and ornamental foliage
    02Other live plants (including their roots), cuttings and slips; mushroom spawn.
    20Trees, shrubs and bushes, grafted or not, of kinds which bear edible fruit or nuts

    OGD Extension : 001766
    0017Rooted plants (include greenhouse grown) - fruit (nursery stock)
    66Mango - rooted plants (Mangifera spp.)

    Origin : UFL
    USUnited States
    UFLFlorida

    Destination : ON
    ONOntario

    End Use : 05
    05Propagation (growing or sowing)

    Miscellaneous : 034
    034Without soil, related matter or growing media (bare root

    Recommendations to CBSA/Documentation and Registration Requirements
    Refer to CFIA-NISC(must be accompanied by the following documents\registrations):•Phytosanitary Certificate

    Importer / Broker Instructions
    DOCUMENTATION INSTRUCTIONS
    PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE
    - Obtain from Country of Export prior to importation.

    CONDITIONS OF IMPORT
    The Phytosanitary Certificate must accompany the shipment.

    The material must be free of all growing media, soil and/or related matter.

    Good luck.
    FYI, I find my mango seedling very fussy and demanding of warmth and humidity so be prepared to baby.
     
  4. Frazrking

    Frazrking Member

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    Murphy, Thank you so much for that info, Perfect timing as I have not paid just yet. I Should change my location to Vancouver as I am in Richmond BC lol. We are neighbors.
    As for the import regulations, I called the CFIA and spoke to them a couple of weeks ago regarding the mango trees, she walk me through the process and said I should have no problem as long as I have the cert. I plan on going to Point Roberts next week ...I'll make sure to pop in and speak to the CBSA in person with all my info before I attempt to process the order, just to clarify and get some solid info from them. I'll let you know what they say.

    I attempted to contact Perry at floraexotica a few times in the past couple of months but have not received a reply. I heard good things about them as well.

    Once again thank you for the input. (Sorry for the thread jacking Sally)
     
  5. nadia1234

    nadia1234 New Member

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    Hello,
    Just wondering if you were able to get a mango tree?
    I was go ogling dwarf mango trees and stumbled on this conversation.
    Curious to know how it all worked out.
    Many thanks.


     
  6. Grooonx7

    Grooonx7 Active Member

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    Location:
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    While you are searching, you might consider starting a few mangoes from seed (the fruit). I think you should be able to begin one with no more trouble than, say, a chestnut tree.

    I am in Costa Rica for months at a time, and mangoes are just an assumed part of the background tapestry there. There is nothing special about growing them, IF here in Canada you can manage the right temperatures, daylight, and humidity. But the mango in the right conditions is a tough hombre, for sure.

    I eat bananas every day in Canada, but the banana monoculture has really done a lot of damage to the tropical ecosystems. If we were to eat mangoes, we would apparently do much less damage. Or maybe not; maybe if as many people ate mangoes, the monocultures would rise to meet their needs again.
     
  7. nadia1234

    nadia1234 New Member

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    Thanks very much, Groonx7.
    Last night, I actually found someone selling a 10 month old young mango tree for $ 25. The seller didn't know what kind of mango tree but I may end up getting it anyway.
    Costa Rica for the winters is a dream... I retire in 8 years so, hopefully, one day I'll have mangoes in my back yard, too! :)
     
  8. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    I tried several times to grow mangos from seed and I did manage to grow a couple of Julie mangos from fresh seeds, that came from St. Vincent, about 4 years ago. I placed the seeds in a "nursery" pot (one that already had something growing in it), put it in the hothouse and waited......and waited (this was in April). In September when I was moving the plants inside the house I noticed that both of the seeds had started to split and were finally beginning to grow so I put the pot where I could baby it through the winter; making sure they had proper light, heat and humidity. With all this effort I managed to keep them until spring when they could go back into the hothouse; by now they were about 14-16" tall. I babied these two seedling through the summer but unfortunately both succumbed to "something" before the summer was over.

    I have even purchased a mango tree through a local exotic plant sale when it was about 30" tall. Shockingly this tree not only grew in my hothouse but it produced flowers AND fruit before the end of summer. But when fall came and I had to move it inside it struggled....dropping the fruit one by one until it finally succumbed before spring.

    IMG_2156.JPG

    Keep in mind that super market mangos have been chilled to prevent spoilage during transport and, from past experience, I have never found these to germinate. Growing mangos from seed in not an easy or quick thing to do in Vancouver, and hats off to ANYONE who has managed to do so.
     
  9. nadia1234

    nadia1234 New Member

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    P Murphy, thanks so much for your response.
    The pic is really neat!
    We live in Mississauga (Ontario). The seller is in Hamilton, about a 40 minute drive.
    The mango tree would stay in our sunroom for the colder months, alongside the fig tree and sugar canes :). The temp, at its coldest, is about 10 deg Celsius.
    I'll ask the seller how he managed to keep it alive.
    Thanks, again.
     
  10. Grooonx7

    Grooonx7 Active Member

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    Well, your idea of growing a dwarf mango inside a house in Ontario is decidedly going to be an adventure. Personally, I think you were well on the way with your seedlings. To maintain a very high humidity, and to accommodate a mango, I imagine you have a nice indoor arboretum of some description. I'm not sure whether it matters much whether the mango's future is in Ontario or BC; in any Canadian location, it is a long way from home.

    There is advice given for growing them from seed here:
    How to Grow a Mango Plant Indoors

    But you may be way ahead of those writers. I do notice they speak of growing mangoes from supermarket seeds, and I'm just not knowledgeable about supposed damage that might be done by chilling. I wouldn't feel that is necessarily a limiting factor—or not; I just don't know.

    However, your project relies on optimism, in any case. Normally I am pretty careful dealing with living things; however, the future of a supermarket mango is not terribly bright, so you might have the mango's blessing to go ahead and try.

    I almost wondered if you babied your former mangoes too much. You could try something that sounds quite funny, but I know it's been done: watch the weather in Costa Rica (or wherever you like, where mangoes grow easily) and try to more or less match those conditions in your Ontario home. I think sooner or later you'd be successful. Even then, you probably would never know precisely what you did or didn't do that made the difference.

    Here in Vancouver, at the Oakridge shopping mall, there is a Norfolk Pine that was grown indoors in a location with lots of light and supposedly lots of height. However, a botanist told me it was an ill-advised idea, as "lots of height" would certainly become "not enough height". That happened quite a few years ago, and I feel sorry for the tree. So, keeping in mind that you just might be lucky and clever enough to succeed with your mango—and assuming you are, sooner or later—do be sure your lovely mango-to-be has the environment it needs to allow for size and longevity.

    Best of luck.
     
    nadia1234 and Daniel Mosquin like this.
  11. nadia1234

    nadia1234 New Member

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    Thanks for the thoughtful response and link, Groonx7.
    I agree that the project is optimistic but it'll be an adventure, nonetheless.
    I'll keep in mind, too, the Norfolk Pine anecdote.
    Thanks, again.
     
  12. Frazrking

    Frazrking Member

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    Yes, I was able to get the mangoes to Vancouver. I ordered from flora exotica, my trees did not make it very long. After summer they degraded and I lost them. It could be due to my lack of knowledge and care. I will however try again soon.
     
  13. Kurt Schneider

    Kurt Schneider Member

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    I know this is an older thread but I live in the lower mainland and managed to sprout two mango seeds this spring (indoors) out of three. Currently they are about 12-14 inches high and have two whirls of leaves. Both were started in 4 inch starter pots (and one was transplanted to an eight inch pot a month ago). It didn't transplant well and is suffering, but the other is doing well. :)
     

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