Liriodendron tulipifera L. bloom!!!

Discussion in 'Photography and Art' started by C.Wick, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    The beautiful blooms of the Yellow Poplar, growing on the bluffs of the Missouri River in Atchison, County, Kansas.
     

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    Last edited: Jun 24, 2008
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Poplar

    You might want to change your thread title to Yellow Poplar. Otherwise it sounds like the thread is about a Populus sp.
     
  3. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    Re: Poplar

    My apologies for the un-intended confusion. Done.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Re: Yellow Poplar

    Even better, call it Tulip-tree. Calling Yellow Poplar is still stating it is a Populus species.
     
  5. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    Re: Yellow Poplar

    lol...never thought I'd cause so much mis-understanding with the name given to me in a book by National Audubon Society...lol
    fixed!
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Yellow Poplar

    Let's see: Calling it a yellow poplar is no good because it's not a Populus. But even though it's not a Tulipa either...
     
  7. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    Re: Yellow Poplar

    lol...can i just say i give up and will go play bingo instead? :o)
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Yellow Poplar

    21h - 13b - 46j - 56l...
     
  9. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    Re: Yellow Poplar

    lol...fellow humor is ALWAYS appreciated! (i never won at bingo either...)
     
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Re: Yellow Poplar

    Not so. Look at the word order. In Yellow Poplar, 'yellow' is descriptive and 'poplar' is classificationary; in Tulip-tree, 'tulip' is descriptive, and 'tree' is classificationary. Tulip-tree doesn't say it is a Tulipa, any more than Yellow Poplar says it is a type of Yellow. It says it is a tree, which resembles a tulip.
     
  11. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    Re: Yellow Poplar

    I'm thinking at this point? It has become a huge mistake to think that I should try and post a picture of a flower I felt looked beautiful, since I seem to be bringing up arguements not worth the imagery.
    I corrected the title to what it's scientific name is.............please everyone? Just leave it at that and since I'm no plant/tree expert.......be happy that I really thought this tree and bloom were pretty enuf to photograph and share.
     
  12. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    Absolutely fascinating and most appreciated. I personally have never encountered this amazing tree and the beautiful flower. It caused me to look up information, now I am a little more knowledgable than this morning. The fact that you gave the scientific name is all that is required. Some facts.

    Yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), also called tuliptree, tulip-poplar, white-poplar, and whitewood, is one of the most attractive and tallest of eastern hardwoods. It is fast growing and may reach 300 years of age on deep, rich, well-drained soils of forest coves and lower mountain slopes. The wood has high commercial value because of its versatility and as a substitute for increasingly scarce softwoods in furniture and framing construction. Yellow-poplar is also valued as a honey tree, a source of wildlife food, and a shade tree for large areas.

    Magnoliaceae -- Magnolia family

    Yellow-poplar has a singly occurring, perfect flower 4 to 5 cm wide (1.5 to 2 in), with six petals varying in color from a light yellowish green at the margin to a deep orange band at the center. Yellow-poplars usually produce their first flowers at 15 to 20 years of age and may continue production for 200 years.

    http://forestry.about.com/library/silvics/blsillirtup.htm

    More pictures would be most welcome.
     
  13. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    Thanx so much for more information! I knew just a tad of that info. from my Audubon books that I own but not to that extent. I find the age-history especially interesting especially since I know where this particular tree is growing where my father grew up many years ago. The age I'd probably put for this particular one would be around 40+ years as he can remember picking the flowers and taking them to my grandma.
    I'll look thru my files and see what other images of this interesting tree I can find.......have you noticed yet the unusual shape of the leaves?
     
  14. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    Indeed I did notice the leaf, and I am in an area of Southern Ontario, of its habitat, and will look around for the tree, since we have a few acres of Carolina Forest that wasn't raped by the timber industry during the last 200 years. When and if I find a tree, I will be able to exhibit my profound knowledge of the cultivar-thanks to your post.
     
  15. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

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    I love the shape of the leaves. It always looks as if someone has taken a pair of scissors and cut the top off the leaf.
    2. Is a young leaf not fully opened.
     

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  16. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    These are 2 photos I took today after visiting the same tree.......I'm not sure what the 'bud' looking part is? If anyone could help?
     

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  17. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    It is a fruit.
     
  18. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yep, an immature fruit. It'll break up when ripe in the autumn to release the winged seeds.
     
  19. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    ahh. Ok....I was trying to figure out if I'd remembered any sort of a fruit from this tree when I was a kid also.....This whole location had been re-vamped about 7 years ago so things look a lot different. After asking locals around here no one remembered this tree until it started blooming again. But no one remembered the fruits on it.
     
  20. bullseye

    bullseye Active Member

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    I have one in my backyard purchased last summer, due to the fact that it's supposed to be fast growing. I purchased it along with the ginkgo biloba which isn't fast growing. It has leafed out fully but no blooms yet

    http://gardentenders.com/topics/20
     
  21. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

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    Bullseye
     
  22. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    lol...I was going to say all the same!
    a second tree I've seen is HUGE! Growing along the river up in the Kansas side of the Missouri River....if u'r inside the city that tree is going to attract lots of attention.......probably from the utilities dept's........
     
  23. bullseye

    bullseye Active Member

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    I'll be gone from the house by then
     
  24. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I've seen flowering on planted specimens here that probably weren't that old. These were probably seedlings in most instances but since grafted magnolias carry the sexual maturity of the stock plants and therefore flower much sooner than seedlings the same may be true of grafted liriodendrons. Grafted named forms of these last on the market also include ones with partially restricted size potential, such as the narrow-growing 'Fastigiata' and the small-growing 'Ardis'.
     
  25. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Very nice photographs. Thank you for sharing.
     

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