Limbs Turning Brown

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by Eric La Fountaine, Jul 12, 2005.

  1. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Re: unknown cedar tree

    The following reply was sent via email:

    I have one of these trees. It survived the winters we have here in Newfoundland. Some of the limbs are turning brown. What will cause this? I planted this tree in a sunny place with some wind protection. It is in a raised flower bed about 4 inches but I planted it in the original ground. We have acidic soil. I need to know if I need to add fertilizer or compost.

    Any help you can give me is appreciated.
    Roxanne
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Roxanne has sent in a photo of her tree.
     

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  3. rxbristol

    rxbristol Member

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    This looks like environmental stress (lack of water before roots are established) to me. How long ago was this planted? What did the roots look like? Was it root bound? Most container planted trees need a lot of water because they have not had time to expand their roots. Mulch will help in this transition. If you give us more information I'm sure you will get more specific advice. I doubt fertilizer or compost will fix the immediate problem.

    Rex
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It's a cypress of some sort, probably a Nootka Cypress.

    How long ago was it planted? I'd agree with Rex, more info would help.
     
  5. WadeT

    WadeT Active Member 10 Years

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    Get that thing some water already!!! :)
     
  6. Davidm

    Davidm Active Member 10 Years

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    Looks more like an Arborvitae to me.Does look stressed.If it was in a pot,maybe the roots have incircled the rootball.If that's the case, and it hasn't been it the ground too long, I think I would dig it up,loosen the rootball alittle and then replant it.
    It doesn't matter how much water you put on it,if it can't get to the feeder roots it will do no good.
     
  7. Davidm

    Davidm Active Member 10 Years

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    If this IS an Arborvitae,it is normal for some of the leaves to turn brown and fall off each year.
    I have 18 of these in my backyard.
     
  8. I bought this tree last (1 year) summer it was in a pot. I believe it was pot bound with a muddy soil. I scraped the sides and bottom to allow the roots to expand. The roots looked good.

    I will get some mulch around it to keep the soil moist. We just had some rain. Is Cedar Mulch ok or should I get some other type?
     
  9. rxbristol

    rxbristol Member

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    Cedar mulch if fine, just don't apply thicker than 3 inches. You can trim the brown needles off--this will make it easier to monitor its progress. While you're at it, look for any insects such as spider mites, excessive sap around the trunk because of borers, and bag worms. It normally takes two to three years for a tree to become established where it doesn't require constant looking after.

    Rex
     
  10. douglas

    douglas Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi you might want to do google search on flagging

    Regards Doug
     

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