Lilac Tree

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by imtaken, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. imtaken

    imtaken Member

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    I would like to know how to get a starter off a lilac tree. My friend has a lilac tree and said I can use it to get a starter off it but I dont know how. Do I cut part of a branch off it and if I do what do I do to get it started.
     
  2. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    They can be grown from cuttings, however it's much easier
    to propagate from a root sprout if you can find one. Usually
    there will be several a or more foot away from the main trunk.
    Dig one up with as much root as you can get and plant it
    in a pre-dug hole. Water well and prune it to leave half a dozen
    leaves and shade it for a few days to allow it to recover.
    HTH
    Chris
     
  3. conifers

    conifers Active Member

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    Hi imtaken,

    Chris is right on the money for sure. Otherwise, here's what Dirr and Heuser suggests for, Syringa vulgaris:

    CUTTINGS: Much discussion has occurred about the propagation of lilacs by shoot cuttings. There are as many methods as lilac propagators. The optimum timing has been related to a number of plant growth characteristics. Some reports relate the timing to condition and size of the cuttings, i.e., when new growth has reached 4 - 6" and before stems become woody. Other reports recommend taking cuttings when flowers first begin to open or shortly thereafter. Finally, another group suggests taking cuttings before the terminal bud is visible. Spring softwood cuttings are preferred. Cuttings are collected just as the flowers are starting to open and until the end of the blooming season. Treat with IBA (1600 to 5000 ppm depending upon cultivar) and place in coarse sand or perlite under a white poly tunnel or mist.

    ...Layering is also possible for small numbers [Arnoldia 19 (6-7):36 (1959)l. Bend down shoots in the spring when the buds are swelling and wound the bases. Cuttings are ready for harvest the following spring.

    Layering seems to be the easiest option #2 for you.

    Regards,

    Dax
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2007
  4. conifers

    conifers Active Member

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    You might add to the remarks of Chris that the cutting will need to be constantly moist in order for them to survive. A temporary nursery bed in partial shade or morning sun only or of similar would provide a great place, and you should provide this 'division' this home for close to a full year. Come early fall should this method be accessible, drive a spade shovels at 4-5 equidistant points about 6" from the stem and then the following Spring (next 2008) ...dig that stem up and transplant it to it's permanent location and keep continuing to water it at least once or twice a week.

    I have a friend in the nursery business and it's true what he says. It's 'good plants that begin with strong/the best possible root systems.' Root systems with fibrous, well-developed masses that make robust specimens as well as healthier specimens because the plant has more capability to fight bugs and disease (as a result of a root system, actually).

    My mother would just dig it up though and water it all the time and her plant will always make it too. So whatever kind of a gardener you are. That's how you approach the "aftercare." She's been gardening all her life.

    Lastly, my mothers motto is, "good gardeners are gardeners that water."

    Dax
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2007

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