lights

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by Tom24, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. Tom24

    Tom24 Active Member

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    I was wondering if anyone can help I recently bought two of the ge 48 inch grow lights with ecolux and I am using them in my plant room seems like my plants like it but it doesn,t seem to give out a hole lot of light. I also have some just resadental 48 inch lights as well. They seem to give off more light. Can anybody give me advice on what light to use ? They also get about 6 or more hours of nature light but its starting to get cold here so they will be indoors now and I need some good artifical light.

    Thank you Tom
     
  2. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    Tom--fluorescent tubes give quite weak light, so the plants have to be kept right up close, like a few inches from the tube. This also means that large plants won't work, coz only the tips of the branches will get adequate light. Trays of seedlings work best, as well as rosette type plants (african violets thrive under grow lights like this!).

    Everyone I've heard says the cheap cool white tubes work just as well for growing as the special, and expensive, reddish tinted grow bulbs, which apparently work better for producing flowers. I have one tube of each in my setup, just to be sure.

    There are other high intensity lights available if you really want to keep large plants going inside, these are not fluorescent and gobble up a lot more electricity.
     
  3. Tom24

    Tom24 Active Member

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    I do have two of the Ge grow lights which are the 48 inch florescant lights and I also have 48 inch residental florescent lights I was wondering which would be better to use I paid alot for the grow lights and like 4.00 for two of the residental florescents.
     
  4. Seamus

    Seamus Active Member

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    The grow lights just emit a slightly hotter spectrum of light then the residential ones I'm guessing. You probably want cool spectrums for your plants, that means the grow bulbs are more or less a waste of money. Depending on what you have growing and how big they are you could continue using the 48" tubes as suplimental lighting or you could go out and buy yourself a 200w or 400w metal halide fixture. They're hot and they use lots of electricity compaired to fluorescents but the quality of light is much better. A 400w bulb could likely illuminate a 5'x5' area well enough to supply any plants you had with adequite light if you had it fairly close and used a wide reflector. Of course if you're just growing some small potted plants I'd stick with the 48" tubes, just put them close and use lots.
     
  5. Tom24

    Tom24 Active Member

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    How many and how close would you suggest I have 1 majesty and some washintonia robustas seedlings and a sago palm in my plant room the rest I have with sun bulbs and they get sun from the window during the day. Thank you in advance.

    Tom
     
  6. Tom24

    Tom24 Active Member

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    I brought back the grow bulbs and I picked up some full spectrum daylight 48 inch flourescent bulbs.
     
  7. Seamus

    Seamus Active Member

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    Get the bulbs about an inch away from the top of the plants, just make sure they don't touch the plants. Depending on how large the plants are you can add or reduce the amount of light you give them. If you had the seedlings under a pair of the 48" tubes then I'd say thats enough, the palm might be harder to supply any decent amoutn of light to, espcially with a fluorescent tube. A 45w compact fluorescent bulb in a reflector if positioned closely might do the trick though as supplimental lighting during the morning and evenings.
     
  8. PhillyPalms

    PhillyPalms Active Member

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    When I switched to halide and sodium it made a huge difference. Yes, the cost is higher for powering them, but what a difference. Now my citrus blooms indoors around the end of December, and goes outside in April loaded with fruit. I have a 400 watt halide, and a 400 watt sodium. Also my Texas Star banana has fruited , using these lights. Well worth it to me. My electric bill increases by around $ 25.00 - $30.00 per month when the two lights are on a 12 hour cycle.
     
  9. Tom24

    Tom24 Active Member

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    How much did they cost and where did you get them?

    Thank you

    Tom
     
  10. PhillyPalms

    PhillyPalms Active Member

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    They're "Hydrofarm" brand lights. I got them online. I can't remember what I paid. It was over 6 years ago, but I will admit they were a little pricey. I think they were over 200. each. Other companies make them for less, too, but you pay for what you get.

    Go to : www.hydrofarm.com
     
  11. PhillyPalms

    PhillyPalms Active Member

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    Also, these lights need to be at least 12-18 inches away from the foliage. Especially the sodium.
     

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