Leafless Meyer Lemon

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by Roz, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. Roz

    Roz Member

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    My potted Meyer Lemon has lost all of it's leaves.Reading all these threads leads me to believe it's the forced air heat and lack of humidity. I'm left with stalks. Do you think there is any chance that it will grow new leaves in spring? Should I continue to water and hope for the best or am I wasting my time?

    Thank you!
     
  2. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    Fret not, unless you let it go bone dry for weeks, however if the limbs are green and supple, you will have to be patient, and the foliage will return. Keep the plant draft free, heat vent free and plenty of direct daylight, ie: your brightest window...
     
  3. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The tree will require very little water, because there are no leaves to transpire the moisture. The optimum temperature for root and leaf growth is 86F. I would give your tree a 60/40 chance. - Millet
     
  4. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    I have been in your shoes, the tree looked ravaged and barren, but it came back, and moisture was vital to its' recovery.
    Do not keep the plant above 20c. (70F.) it will other wise perish ( dry out even further ), until leaf set of course.
     
  5. aesir22

    aesir22 Active Member

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    Some conflicting advice lol whether to keep it warm or slightly less warm. If it was me, Roz, I would make sure the air is not baking, but I would heat the soil slightly to provide a good temperature for growth. As for the watering, it will need very little water, but make sure when you do water, it is very thoroughly, and let it dry out between waterings as you would if it had leaves.
     
  6. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    aesir22 is correct, when he states providing bottom heat is important for the recovery of your tree. Citrus roots stop functioning at a realitively high temperature of 55.4 F. At or below 55.4F, your tree's root system cannot function, therefore will not have any growth. K Baron is also correct when she lists 70F as an acceptable temperature for citrus roots. Everything in citrus has an optimum growth temperature, and for citrus roots it is 86F. BTW 86F is also an optimum temperature for germinating citrus seeds. Citrus trees produce their food (photosynthates) through a process involving the tree's leaves, light, and CO2. Your tree does not have any leaves to carry this process forward, therefore it must relay on the little amount of green plastids present in the bare trunk, and branches. As long as the wood remains green, there is hope. Still the chances are about 60/40. Just be sure not to over water, a leafless tree will not use much moisture. Luckily for your tree, spring with its longer days is near. Hopefully, the tree will not begin to die back from the top down. Meyer lemon, is not the easiest variety of citrus for a beginner tree. Good luck to this tree. - Millet
     
  7. Roz

    Roz Member

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    Thank you everyone! I'll keep my fingers crossed. I had my first lemon this past summer and I was so thrilled. I finally harvested it for my Christmas pudding in December. I also have a small lime tree which is doing very well.
    Thanks again for your advice. If it doesn't come back, I'll buy another as it gave me a lot of joy.

    Roz
     
  8. Roz

    Roz Member

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    Thank you everyone! I'm so happy to report that I see tiny leaves developing. !!!!! I'm so thrilled.

    Many many thanks for taking the time to respond to my post. I really appreciate it. Hopefully, I'll be harvesting lemons again this summer

    Roz
     
  9. Futura

    Futura Member

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    Great news.
    If you can please attach some photos of your success.
     
  10. 829

    829 Active Member

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    If it is of any help, when I first purchased Meyer's, I had a ball and then winter came and they survived, only to be killed back to the graft last spring during a late arctic blast while in the greenhouse. I nurtured them all of last year and I now am waiting waiting on 22 lemons on 3 plants that budded last September. They are wee tots and the cold garage has made them just about dormant. I water them every 3 - 4 weeks with siphon water from my aquaponics system.
     

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