In The Garden: leaf id for natural dyer

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by arlee, Nov 1, 2012.

  1. arlee

    arlee Member

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    I’m still not quite sure what these leaves are, but i think they might be in the viburnum family. Whatever they are, a handful yielded up this strong warm yellow on both silk and cotton, a very pleasant surprise. All i did was throw them in a jar and after they soaked for 3 days, add a sprinkle of alum. You can see they have distinct saw edges on the leaf itself and along the petiole, and a narrow curving tip–any help to anyone to identify them?? The shrub also had dark red berries, not clumped but as a cherry bunch would grow, all coming from one point and on their own petioles.
    The yellow is actually much darker and stronger on the silk fabric and the cotton thread, but i wanted the leaves in good light for ID purposes.
     

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  2. arlee

    arlee Member

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    Thanks, me--they are a type of viburnum
     
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    A photo of the plant? The leaves are from neither of the two Viburnum species native / introduced (and spreading in) to Alberta.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The leaves look cherry-like to me. Fresh foliage would be easier to identify, though.
     
  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Agree with Michael -- large glands on the petioles usually hint at something in Prunus.
     

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