Largest Sequoia sempervirens trunk / potential

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by M. D. Vaden, Jan 5, 2015.

  1. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Last summer, we discovered several giant Coast Redwoods, and the preliminary volume measurement for the one shown, done by Ron Hildebrant, was 38,299 cu. ft. excluding basal or reiterated stems. The largest listed for the species has 6,000 cubic ft in a basal stem off the roots included in its 42,500 cubic ft., so the main trunk is 36,500 cu. ft. ... the 2nd largest Melkor used to be called "Fusion Giant" and as the name implies appears like two trunks fused, with different looking bark on either side of the line up the middle. Ron is mentioned in Forest Giants of the Pacific Coast, by Robert Van Pelt, in a book The Wild Trees, etc., so his name may sound familiar. He's been part of the tree discovery network of northern California for 20 years or more.

    A future research climb could pin-point the volume closer, but for now, this tree has potential to be the largest known single redwood trunk. The lion's share is in the main bole. There are several small stems that have at least 400 cu. ft., but probably no more than 800 cu. ft. all combined. Every extra stem is off the trunk and none from the roots. All are part of the tree structure.

    No name is published for the tree. The location is broadly described as Redwood National and State Parks, which are in Humboldt and Del Norte counties of northern California.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
  2. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    Fascinating. Thank you for posting.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I've heard it proposed that these were once bigger than the Sierra redwoods, before logging.
     
  4. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    There is actually documentation in the Blue Lake Museum in northern California. Photos and documents, measurements.

    General Sherman Giant Sequoia, the largest tree today, would have been about 60% the volume of the largest Coast Redwood, pre-1900
     
  5. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    A related update. Several new coast redwoods were found recently that each had a new largest known diameter for the species Sequoia sempervirens.

    The widest of them, is wider than every known Sequoiadendron in the United States, meaning Coast Redwoods is now the species with the widest trunk among the two redwoods.
     
  6. bjo

    bjo Active Member 10 Years

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    A great photo of a fabulous tree - thank you for posting.
    One of the great joys in my life was to see (experience) the coast redwoods in their home. It is over 40 years ago but the impression that they made is a strong as ever.

    Something that i have been wondering / worrying about is how they may be affected by climate change.... does anyone know what the thinking is on this ?

    BrianO
     
  7. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    May depend on individual groves, but in general, they are putting on historically huge amounts of wood growth the past 100 years. They like the conditions a lot right now.

    RE the temporary lesser rains of Northern California the past couple years, some of the tallest redwoods are growing height faster than during the more rainy years.
     

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