Kumano Cherry in Japan - new species found recently

Discussion in 'Ornamental Cherries' started by H.Kurata, Oct 30, 2019.

  1. H.Kurata

    H.Kurata New Member

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    I would like to share everyone about new flowering cherry species recently found in Japan (Kii-peninsula) as attached. H.Kurata Oct.30, 2019
    upload_2019-10-30_23-43-6.jpeg
    upload_2019-10-30_23-43-36.jpeg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2019
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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thank you for posting your beautiful photos. When you say "recently", when were these photos taken? Were these trees in bloom all at the same time? Are the different blossom photos in the same order as the tree photos?
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Associated botanical name and botanical description?
     
  4. H.Kurata

    H.Kurata New Member

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    Dear Wendy,
    These photos are taken March on 2018 and 2019.
    In local South of Kii Peninsula, they tend bloom bit earlier than Yamazakura. It has very much distinguish beautiful pink color.

    Dear Ron,
    Scientific name of it is Cerasus kumanoensis T. Katsuki (Rosaceae), sp. nov.
    Detail information is available from here:
    https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/apg/69/2/69_201801/_pdf/-char/ja
    If this link does not work, please send me an email at flowering_cherry@icloud.com,
    then I can forward the PDF file of Dr.Katsuki’s report.

    Best regards

    H.Kurata
     
  5. H.Kurata

    H.Kurata New Member

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    You may wonder there are so many variation on petal shape and color, but it is as you seen and they are wild species found 11th (some says 10th) after about 100 years of silence when lastly Prunus specious was found.
     
  6. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thank you for clarifying that these are all the same species - I did assume they were different species or cultivars. And thank you for the link to Dr. Katsuki's report. It took maybe a minute to load (seemed like a long time on a computer, just showed a blank page for a while, and I have a fast connection), but it did load. I note particularly the blossom photos on page 4 (says page 122 in the document), particularly photos D and E, showing the extreme differences shown in your photos (one flower with petals wide, flat and overlapping, one with petals narrow, curled and not overlapping at all).
     
  7. eteinindia

    eteinindia Active Member VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I'm sorry I didn't write about Kumano-zakura, but it was judged to be a new species last year, 2018. It was a new wild cherry found after 103 years since the last wild cherry, Oshima was found in 1915. It was a very big topic in Japan last year.
    Wikipedia: Kumano-zakura

    Also I'd like to introduce H. Kurata. who lives in Kii Peninsula. This spring he visited Kumano-zakura spots many times and presented about those trees at the annual meeting of Sakura Society of Japan. I met him there a few years ago. He is not a professional but he has a licence of interpreter-guide and he has visited a famous cherry farm in England, took its owner to Matsumae , Hokaido, met Mr. Asari and talked about Matsumae varieties in England.
    He loves cherries and also is interested in Cherries in Vancouver. I asked him to be a member of UBC Forums and write about cherries in Japan.
     
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  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Above hyperlink opens to a Wikipedia page written in Japanese with a warning that the link may not be secure.
     
  9. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    If you're not planning to update the page, it's hard to see what the risk would be. In Edge browser, the page was translated automatically for me. Not all that well translated. Mr. Katsuki's treatise (in English) reads better. Still, it's readable.
     
  10. eteinindia

    eteinindia Active Member VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I'm sorry, I sent my posting without seeing #4. I'm not sure why I couldn't see it. But Dr. Katsuki's treatise is much much better than Wikipedia because it's an originl.
    By the way, I used google translation before. But it was awful. This time I used Bing translation because I thought it's better.
    But Bing translation and Wikipedia are not good combination. Even if I logged in Microsoft and Wikipedia it said Not logged in.(Last time I didn't logged in both.)
    I changed my link. I hope you can see it without warning this time.
    Bing translation is better but still it's not good. I can't understand why they translate the title, Kumano-zakura as "Black-tailed Cherry Tree".
     

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