Identification: 'Kiku-shidare-zakura'? Or something else?

Discussion in 'Ornamental Cherries' started by Susanhuang28, Apr 10, 2015.

  1. Susanhuang28

    Susanhuang28 Active Member

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    The full blooming 'Kiku-shidare-zakura' tree located in a private yard on the south side of East 29Th St. (between St. Christophers Rd and Masefield Rd.)
     

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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Re: North Vancouver

    It's amazingly good-looking for 'Kiku-shidare-zakura'.
     
  3. Douglas Justice

    Douglas Justice Active Member UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society 10 Years

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    Re: North Vancouver

    Indeed it is. I wonder if it might actually be something different. On the other hand, I don't see an obvious graft union. Perhaps it's been budded low on the stem (or on its own roots) and not infected with bacterial canker (note the 15th St. example with the obvious stem cankers, which is more typical). There is still plenty of die-back in the crown, but it has a density of branches, and plenty of ascending ones, not usually seen in the typically sparse, pendulous crown of 'Kiku-shidare-zakura'. Hmmm.
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    We don't have other options listed for weak trees with flowers like this, but I see in Kuitert (Japanese Flowering Cherries) 'Asano', being narrowly funnel-shaped, and you, Douglas, mention in our book (Ornamental Cherries in Vancouver) that 'Kiku-shidare-zakura' is broader than 'Cheal's Weeping', but we don't have the latter one in the book. Maybe this is the real 'Kiku-shidare-zakura'? It looks like the weepy bits have been pruned, so it has the umbrella-style for weeping trees around here.

    I'm not usually in favour of looking for more options to make our scouting job more difficult.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Doesn't look coarse and pink enough in these views to be the common, familiar one ("Prunus serrulata Double Weeping" of nurseries) - leaves and twigs look too slender, flowers too petite etc.
     
  6. Douglas Justice

    Douglas Justice Active Member UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society 10 Years

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    Agreed. This is one we should watch. It would be good to compare stem diameter, pendulousness and leaf characteristics with the typical chrysanthemum-flowered weeping serrulata type. According to Kuitert, 'Cheal's Weeping' is a narrower, leaner, less floriferous sport of 'Kiku-shidare-zakura' selected in England. Perhaps the typical one in commerce here is really (the inferior) 'Cheal's Weeping' and this one is the real McCoy.
     

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