Kaffir lime and Ponderosa lemon fruit

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by msallie, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. msallie

    msallie Member

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    I just purchased a Ponderosa lemon and a Kaffir lime and was hoping someone could tell me when they might bear any fruit. Much smaller plants were already bearing fruit in the store, but I opted for the taller patio style with only leaves (and thorns!). I was hoping to have some fresh lemonade in the summertime, and have thought of returning my plants for some that may already be producing. I water when the soil is dry or the leaves look curly and I've added citrus fertilizer. They look pretty healthy to me (not that I really know). Any help would be appreciated!
    PS You have a really nice site
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    If these trees are grafted varieties then they should be ready to flower and bear fruit, if not now then within a year or two. Look for the presence of a diagonal graft between the variety and the rootstock it's growing on. The Kaffir lime on the right appears to have a graft 6" above the soil. The Ponderosa has something similar a bit lower down. You could always contact the nursery to confirm that these are grafted trees. They are nice looking trees by the way.
     
  3. msallie

    msallie Member

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    It appears they have a grafting bend about 4 inches up from the soil. I will keep my fingers crossed that they'll give me something this season.
    Thanks for the response and complement. I'll be sure to tell my trees!
     
  4. Laaz

    Laaz Active Member 10 Years

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    I wouldn't expect any lemonade this summer. Most citrus take 6 or more months to ripen from the bud stage. Kaffir lime is used for the leaves.
     
  5. msallie

    msallie Member

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    Darn. Maybe I will go pick up one of the already fruiting versions from the store. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good lemon and lime tree type? I see everything from Mexican, Key, Persian limes to Meyers, Ponderosas, Buddha Hand lemons and have no idea which ones will give me the perfect lemonade lemon or typical Sunkist lime.
    I will appreciate any suggestions!
     
  6. Laaz

    Laaz Active Member 10 Years

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    Being your in central FL, most any will do well for you. Mexican & Key are the same lime, small & seedy. Persian or Bearss Lime is the lime you get at the grocery store (Seedless). As for Lemons, my favorite is the Bearss Lemon. You can also go with Lisbon, Eureka or for sweet Lemon look for Sanbokan.

    Ponderosa is a Lemon / Citron hybrid which makes huge Lemons.
     
  7. msallie

    msallie Member

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    Thanks!
    I will look out for those. If I buy one of the shorter, squattier already fruiting trees (bush shaped) do I prune it to get it taller or will it just eventually get taller like my patio ones? (I am trying for the patio style trees)
     
  8. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Buddha's Hand is a citron, not a lemon. It is mostly rind. Highly ornamental nevertheless.
     
  9. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The lemons that are commonly sold at supermarkets, are Eureka and Lisbon Lemons. They are so simular few people can tell them apart by looking, unless they know what to look for. They taste the same. Both the Eureka and the Lisbon lemons are a very easy trees to grow. Ponderosa lemons are larger but are not commonly sold in stores, they are more of a novelity.- Millet
     
  10. Tsmith2579

    Tsmith2579 Member

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    I started my Ponderosa from a cutting. It took all autumn, winter and into spring before it was rooted well enough to transplant. It grew the first year to about 6 feet tall and then bloomed the next February. It was approx. 18 months old when it bloomed. This was in a cool greenhouse. I don't heat my greenhouse during the day unless it is one of the rare days when the outside temps don't go above freezing.
     

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