Jubaea chilensis

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by Deneb1978, Sep 7, 2004.

  1. Deneb1978

    Deneb1978 Active Member 10 Years

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    Hello there,

    I am wondering if Jubaea Chilensis will be able to survive Vancouver winters or not (if they are hardy enough) and I am wondering if there are any displays of public palms other than T. Fortunei or T. Wagnerianus on display anywhere in the city. It seems to me that the only public palms here that I've seen so far are T. Fortunei and Waggies.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I wouldn't count on the Jubaea, plant with the knowledge that it will be strictly experimental.
     
  3. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I would say borderline hardy at best.
     
  4. Wes North Van

    Wes North Van Active Member 10 Years

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    There have been jubaeas growing in the ground for a decade in places like North Van, Vancouver, Victoria and Salt Spring. All have survived however some on this side of the water did suffer last winter but did recover. With age I believe this could turn into a long term palm here. The PNWPEPS believes this to be one, if not the hardiest pinnate palm around. I also believe that butia eriospatha may be a close second.
    As Jimmyq said however it is still a bit of an experiment but it is looking promising.
     
  5. theres 2 in a alexandra park in downtown vancouver..... beach ave, burnaby and bidwell streets are the borders... they are located along beach ave, in the middle on either side of a fountain... they dont look so great this year as last winter was a bit nasty, but i'm sure they'll survive.... origionally they were bought by the city from cedar rim nursery in langley
     
  6. Just a short note to let you know that the two palms at Alexandra Park are not Jubeas, but are Jelly Palms (Butia Capitata) - sorry if spelling is incorrect. I have a butia that is apx. 6 feet tall (to the top of the arching fronds, not the base itself - which is apx. 3 feet tall and apx. 3 feet round at the base) which survived on Pender Island in the Gulf Islands without any protection last winter. Jubeas are very slow growing, but once established and of a significant size, would probably survive ok here in the lower mainland / gulf islands.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    10 years of persistence doesn't prove much, California Specials such as these may grow for 2 or 3 times as long, then turn to mush when a winter comes along that they can't handle. There's three basic hardiness categories of garden plants: hardy, semi-hardy and tender. If a plant overwinters for awhile it doesn't establish that it will persist indefinitely.
     
  8. Wes North Van

    Wes North Van Active Member 10 Years

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    There is one Jubaea on Beach Ave, I believe it is in Alexandra Park, and many Chamaerops humilis along with the trachycarpus species you mentioned.
    I am not sure the butias are still there, I think they didn't make it after Jan 2004. I could be wrong but I know the jubaea did OK.
    You can tell the difference between butia and jubaea. The butia even at a small size has a frond that is longer and tends to curve downwards and back towards the trunk. The Jubaea's fronds are shorter and stiffer and tend to be straighter.
     
  9. CountryPalms

    CountryPalms Member

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    I totally think that Jubaea Chilensis could survive in Vancouver! With proper protection in harsher winters for the first few years that it's outside, it shouldn't have any problem surviving here. But I wonder if those Jubaeas in Alexandra Park are still there because I checked on google street view and I don't see them.
     
  10. billdango

    billdango Member

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    hi i live in the south of england and i am still learning about palms growing in B.C .i would think that with some protection j chiliensis may be possible in your part of the world . here in southern england they can grow to a large size .[i have a ten year old ] eight foot specimen in my back garden that has taken temperatures to-7c ' so always remember ,nothing ventured nothing gained ..
    rgds ,billdango.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    There are reasons why the windmill palm is the only one seen for a long time in the general landscape here, and it's not for lack of anyone trying other kinds. Even that one can get hammered if it gets below say, 10 degrees F. - as occurred during a recent winter where multiple windmill palms are planted along a route I take frequently.
     
  12. Delvi83

    Delvi83 Active Member

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    Have you ever eaten its fruits? They should be edible..
     

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