Jubaea chilensis

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by LPN, Sep 15, 2006.

  1. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    This Jubaea chilensis (Chilean Wine Palm) was started by me from seed 9 years ago. It never was afforded any luxurys, like a heated greenhouse, only overhead cover. This Summer it was planted as the roots pushed out of the 10 gallon pot. There are several others around the Northwest, most noteably Walt Rockfelllows Jubaea in Seattle standing 10' - 12' tall.

    Cheers, LPN.
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Winters have been mild.
     
  3. Canadianplant

    Canadianplant Active Member

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    i thought that if you have an older specimen it can make it more cold tolerant. in some species
     
  4. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    It's thought that cold hardiness increases with a palms age ... true. The biggest problem is finding large specimen, especially Jubaea chilensis. Price would be a huge deterant in most situations. Availability is near non-existant for these palms right now.
    Another point to consider ... palms coming in from growers in California and elsewhere, are not aclimatized. Even the Windmill palm can flinch, if delivered a hard cold snap coming off the trailer from sunny SoCal. Some so shaken, they'll perish.
    So age plays a part, as does rearing.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  5. Canadianplant

    Canadianplant Active Member

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    thats what i was thinking........ so does that mean you can take a palm thats borderline hardy when its young and have it acclimitzed over a period of years when its larger 9 especially if you start from seed?
     
  6. Canadianplant

    Canadianplant Active Member

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    LPN.... i was wondering if you know anything about the dypsis family?
     
  7. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Canadianplant...only that apon searching it in "The Tropical Look" by Robert Lee Riffle (who past away a short time ago ... R.I.P.), I was refered to Chrysalidocarpus & Neodypsis which are both palms indigious to Madagascar.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  8. Canadianplant

    Canadianplant Active Member

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    ic ... then what kind of palms/ plants are you more familiar with?
     
  9. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Regarding your previous thread about growing from seed and raising hardy palms ... perhaps to some small degree it's true. All I think you can hope for, is that it maybe more in "rhythm" with your climate. Adaptation can be a harder hurdle to cross. You can't make a palm become hardy to your climate. Only another ice age could help us here. Having said that, seed raised palms that are exposed to as much as they will bare, may push it a touch in your favor, once mature.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Only if exceptionally hardy individuals, within the parameters of the species are revealed by planting quantities of seedlings and growing on those that survive. Individual plant specimens do not adapt, only species adapt. Whatever hardiness a plant has from the start of its life is the hardiness that individual will have everywhere, throughout its life. Becoming more tolerant with maturity is not unusual, that could be considered reaching its full level of hardiness.
     
  11. flipper83

    flipper83 Member

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    Hi, what is the most key to getting these things started from seed. I picked up a few seeds off the web, and had little success with getting any germination. I did both carefully cracking the outer shell, and not. I also used heat from the bottom on some. No success.

    I can't vouch for how fresh the stock was, but any hints would be appreciated.
     
  12. Canadianplant

    Canadianplant Active Member

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    go to rarepalmseeds.com and go to archive near the bottom right of the page and lookin there
     
  13. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    "most key" .... fresh seed produces the best results.
     
  14. flipper83

    flipper83 Member

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    Thanks, I was using some of the advise at rarepalmseeds.com when I first got the seeds. I think the problem is definitely the freshness of the seeds.

    Thanks
     
  15. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years

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    I think it is a couple of things, fresh seed, and patience.
    My grade one and two classes have been growing Palms, they've had great success, and have been selling the palms for profit.
     
  16. palmera

    palmera Active Member

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    I also agree with the patience...I had ordered various seed from RPS with mixed results (due to freshness I'd guess). I began the process in Jan. and fussed with bottom heat and moisture and had 2 or 3 each of my assorted Trachys and Sabals germinate in peat filled zip-lock bags. The bags that had not, were tossed aside in May and quite literally forgotten about in my garage. Last week I noticed that 3 sabal minors 'Lousiana', 2 T 'naga hills', and a T 'nanus' had not only sprouted, but were already 2-3 inches tall!

    Be very sure the seed is a dud before throwing it out!

    Palmera
     
  17. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years

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    The last batch the kids sprouted, they started in January. I still see new ones starting to sprout. The seeds they use are always fresh T. Fortunei.
     
  18. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I've had palm seed germinate literally years after they where started. Some hold viability for quite a while, and others not so. Some are just slow to germinate and some require specific conditions to germinate. There's a lot to learn about palm seed germination, and personal accounts vary as well to add to the confusion.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  19. Palm Lady

    Palm Lady Member

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    I agree with the statement regarding the variability of palm germination. That variability also applies to growth as well. Two seeds that break and are planted at the same time may have drastically different growth habits. This makes landscape design with immature palms challenging, at best. Installing mature palms is the only way to insure that the design is maintained.

    After growing palms for 25 years, I have found Jubaea to be THE MOST difficult palm to cultivate. In my experience, even a small one can withstand extremes of heat and cold but wet soil will kill it.

    Palm Lady
     
  20. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Palm Lady

    I too have been cultivating palms for 25 years (congradulations on your silver anniversary). For me, Jubaea chilensis has been relatively trouble free once germinated. Interesting how different growers can have such different results. Again, personal accounts vary. I believe as you say "wet soil will kill it" with one condition, drainage. As long as drainage is good, you can water your Jubaea (nearly) every day.

    Cheers, LPN.
     

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