Jm soil suggestions

Discussion in 'Maples' started by garcrob, Apr 21, 2010.

  1. garcrob

    garcrob Member

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    I just purchased my first jm, i will post some pics later tonight,

    the soil i planted it in was regular potting soil, some smaller rocks and clay pellets at the bottom to ensure drainage. On top of the soil i have sphagnum moss to help retain moisture in the soil.

    I planted it last weekend, and checked the soil on lunch today and discovered it was soaking wet from when i watered it yesterday. It seems to drain water from the holes on the bottom when watered

    WHAT TYOE OF SOIL DO YOU HAVE YOUR J. MAPLE IN?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Rocks etc. in the bottom of a pot retard drainage, by causing an abrupt change in texture which draining water backs up behind. Only when field capacity (saturation) is reached does the water then push through.

    The only time a drainage layer produces an improvement is when the container is a large planter, with long horizontal distances without drainage holes. Rocks in the bottom can help move the water sideways and out of the holes.
     
  3. garcrob

    garcrob Member

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    thanks for your point of view but i dont agree with that statement

    i have the lose medium in the bottom of the pot to aid in drainage, water will follow the laws of gravity and drain through the rocks, as it has been.

    can you explain how a change in texture effects water flow? it doesn't make any sense.
     
  4. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Whether you agree or not your plant (you said you planted it, but it now seems to be in a pot) is obviously not draining, and as it is it will die very quickly if you don't act immediately
     
  5. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Some people call it a perched water table.

    In your case it sounds like the best option is to wash the soil off the roots and start again. You can increase the drainage of your soil mix by adding course grit, gravel (not sand), pine bark and perlite etc throughout the whole mix, not just at the bottom. If the holes in the bottom of the planter are large you will need to cover them with broken terracotta or flat stones to help prevent too much soil being washed out, but that is the only extra you need at the bottom.
     
  6. garcrob

    garcrob Member

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    alright i will do as you say, i will repot the jm today and let you know what happens
    thank you both for the info.
     
  7. garcrob

    garcrob Member

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    Why no sand? i know i have read that sand improves drainage? is this wrong?

    i have a lot of plants that i mixed sand into the soil to help drainage, the biggest
    problem i have with pure soil is the compaction that occurs after watering the plant

    what about using sphagnum moss in the mix? would that work
     
  8. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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  9. garcrob

    garcrob Member

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    Very informative article, thanks for sharing,

    And for the two guys that I was arguing with, sorry, you’re right.
     
  10. STi

    STi Active Member

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    That tree won't last long in those conditions..JM'S hate wet feet! I use Western fir bark and perlite and alittle lime.
     

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