jasmine tree

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by pamhuff, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. pamhuff

    pamhuff Member

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    cokumbus, ohio, US
    i have recently been given a jasmine tree. I would like to start another one form this tree. It has small red-orange fruits on it. Can I plant one of them, and what do I do to prepare the seed. Or, is it better to try to start a cutting? thanks!
     
  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Your tree is a Murraya paniculata, Orange Jessamine. If you choose to start one from seed you'll need to first remove the soft pulp surrounding the seed. However it I believe it's easier to root semi-hardwood cuttings which may result in plants that flower sooner; it would probably be better to do this in the spring.
     
  3. Susant

    Susant Member

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    Thanks, Junglekeeper! How would I start cuttings? Would I have to root them first?
     
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Rooting a Cutting
    Select and cut an appropriate section of stem, 3-4" long, from the mother plant. Wet the bottom end, dip in rooting hormone powder[super]*[/super], then tap lightly to remove excess powder. Plant in a starter mix of vermiculite and peat. Apply water to keep the mix moist but not wet. Roots should develop in 1-2 months.

    A good indicator of success is new growth from the dormant buds. It will help to place the cutting in a warm environment with higher humidity. This can be achieved with a Jiffy tray equipped with a clear plastic dome. Consider making several cuttings to ensure success as it is unlikely that all will root.


    There's a slightly more complicated method to propagate plants. Air-layering involves inducing a stem to root while it's still attached to the mother plant. The benefit to this method is the stem continues to receive nutrients as it develops new roots.

    Air-layering a Stem
    Make an angled cut 1/3 of the way into the stem with a sharp tool (e.g. Xacto knife). Moisten the cut and apply rooting hormone powder[super]*[/super]. Place a toothpick or a strand of moss into the cut to keep it open. Wrap the area around the cut with a layer of moist sphagnum moss which in turn is wrapped in a sheet of plastic. Tie off the plastic at the top and bottom with twist ties. Cover the plastic casing with black plastic or tinfoil to keep light out.

    Check the moss regularly to ensure it's moist and to see if roots have developed. Once enough roots are in place cut the stem immediately below the roots and transplant to a new pot.

    * Use hormone powder appropriate for the type of cutting. For semi-ripe cuttings use #2 formulation. (e.g. Stim-Root #2)
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2006

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