jasmine ok to go outside yet?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by erin_juniper, Apr 30, 2008.

  1. erin_juniper

    erin_juniper Active Member

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    I won a jasmine plant recently and the person who donated it for the draw told me not tto put it out yet cuz its still too cold but that was about 2 weeks ago. Im in Vancouver btw. Do you think its warm enough to put it outside yet. Id like to get it out of the house and planted into my flowerbed soon as the strong scent doesn't please my partner.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Can you put it out side in a sheltered sunny spot to get it out of the house untill a local let's you know it's safe to plant. I can't give you that information from here as we only go down to about 5 C with an occasional O c

    Liz
     
  3. erin_juniper

    erin_juniper Active Member

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    ya, I can do that
    Its been about 10 degrees in the day here
     
  4. fern2

    fern2 Active Member

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    I keep mine outdoors year round. But, if I'm not supposed to, then I suppose that explains why my plant isn't exactly vigorous or happy... doh.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Overpowering one commonly offered is Jasminum polyanthum. Hardy enough to grow outdoors for years on warm walls near salt water in this region, but not hardy enough to persist through coldest winters here.

    Main issue for you at this time may be change in light exposure from inside house to out in the yard. Probably best to wait until temperatures are more equal, during summer and then first try it in a shady area. If it can be placed so as to grow up into more light from a shaded spot then at that point it can be planted in the ground in a bright area. If the older, lower leaves then burn at least all the new growth will be kept.
     
  6. JCardina

    JCardina Active Member

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    No plant can go directly outside from an indoor situation at any time of the year unless it's tough as nails. You have to harden it off by exposing it for increasing periods of time to outside temps and light. Plants will adapt through a process called thigmomorphogenesis if you do it gently.

    The way I do it is based on how rare or expensive the plant is, if it's very important to me I take a good two weeks to harden it off, if not then a week.

    You have to take it from the house conditions to the same conditions as the spot you will be planting it in gradually. I do an hour the first day then back in the house, then two hours the next day and increase until it can take a full night out and exposure to direct sunshine. Once it's up to 4 hours outside when I take it back in I try to put it in a place as close to the outside conditions as possible, i.e. a cool room.

    If it's going in a sunny spot you need to start in a shady spot and gradually put it in sunnier locations you can do this if you have a dappled spot with part shade or by putting it on a side of a house that gets only a limited amount of sun. If it's going in a windy spot then you need to do the same: gradually expose it to more and more windy areas.

    Once it's hardened off you will usually see the leaves have adapted and look different than they did inside, usually a little thicker.

    This spring has been a nightmare for hardening off plants on the west coast, just when it seems warm enough a cold snap kept coming in. I almost lost a lot of rare and expensive bamboo plants I'd been growing from seeds all winter by being too optimistic about the weather. While it's not a normal spring yet, it seems to have started to warm up enough at night to make risk of frost over.
     
  7. erin_juniper

    erin_juniper Active Member

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    wow, so much info today that I wish I had last week before I planted it outdoors. Well, it's been pretty warm lately and it's planted in an area where its lower half is shaded. The spot is at best a 3/4 sunny area anyway.
    Hopefully it toughs it out.

    If it does end up burning and dying back is there any hope for next yr if I protect it over winter?
     
  8. JCardina

    JCardina Active Member

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    I don't know anything about Jasmine but with most plants, no there is no hope, if it dies completely in early spring and doesn't have any new growth on it all summer then it's not going to come back next year.

    Some plants may lose their leaves and come back after a shock a few weeks later if they were to lose their leaves this time of the year but it would be in the same growing season.

    If you planted it last week and it's still looking alive by the end of next week chances are it will be ok if it's like other plants that I can imagine or like Jasmine. If it was too soon and too much at once it will likely have leaves all turn white then flop over within the first couple weeks.

    If you catch it in the midst of dying but not dead yet sometimes you can preserve them by adding shade or putting a cover on them at night like a cardboard box etc, just be careful not to kill it with attempted kindness by overwatering it or something. It will probably take a lot less water right now than it was inside.
     
  9. erin_juniper

    erin_juniper Active Member

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    thx

    it looks ok, just alot of flowers fell off but the foliage still looks fine.

    crossing fingers...
     
  10. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    In a normal cool to cold maybe not below 0c, Jasmine is as tough as old boots. Given you appear to be in a cold area I would protect it over winter by what ever the method is. Straw, Mulch, a cover????

    Sounds as tho it is going to survive at the moment.

    Liz
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    >Plants will adapt through a process called thigmomorphogenesis if you do it gently<

    That's a response to touching and movement. This can affect things like stem elongation, with movement from wind changing how stems elongate and so forth. The main issues with moving house plants outdoors are sunburn, chilling and insect and slug damage.
     
  12. JCardina

    JCardina Active Member

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    Yes you are right, I stand corrected, it was late when I typed that and wind was a main concern of mine here with my bamboo seedlings.
     

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