Japanese Maple for hot sunny Columbia, South Carolina??

Discussion in 'Maples' started by colagal, Jul 11, 2007.

  1. colagal

    colagal Member

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    My husband and I are trying to decide on a tree for our backyard. We want something different, (no Bradford Pears, please!!!!) and I would really love a Japanese Maple. We live in hot, humid, sunny Columbia, South Carolina. The spot for the tree is on the very edge of a bed, it would receive sun from about noon until 7:00 every day with very minimal shading from some tall pines (sun would really beat on it from about 3-5). Is there any hope for a Japanese Maple?? And if so, what is the tallest, biggest one that would survive the heat and sun? Would an osakazuki make it? Any other suggestions?

    Thank you for any input you are willing to share.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    If you think it is too hot for them to be in the open there you will have to put this one in part shade and choose something else for the afternoon sun aspect. One important point is that typical wild-type green Japanese maple seedlings tend to be tougher than named cultivars, you might be able to manage one of those there. What do you see elsewhere in town? Do other people have good-looking Japanese maples out in the open?
     
  3. colagal

    colagal Member

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    I have seen trees that I know are Japanese maples out in the open receiving a lot of sun. They look really good and full. Unfortunately I have no idea what types of Japanese maples they are.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Take pictures and compare with those at nurseries, get permission to cut a twig and take that to nurseries, ask someone working in their yard if they planted it and which one it was...
     
  5. blake

    blake Active Member 10 Years

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    The standard green Japanese Maple (Acer Palmatum) is going to be your best bet for sun/heat tolerance and size. I don't have first-hand experience with Osakazuki but I've heard they do well in my hot climate (Dallas) only with afternoon shade. (It wouldn't stand a chance here in full sun from 4:00-7:00 every day but my climate is more difficult than yours.) Seiryu is another that takes sun/heat very well as far as Japanese Maples go but probably not more so than an Acer Palmatum.

    All that said, given the amount of sun that spot will receive you're quite possibly setting yourself up for disappointment - the tree it going to require a lot of TLC (robust, well-drained soil, a lot of watering, and upkeep to baby the root system) and it may still burn up in late summer. No way you'll be able to just drop in the ground and let it go. And since it'll likely be in a stressed state annually during the summer the tree may become susceptible to other problems. Even it if survives you're not going to enjoy good fall foilage if the tree suffers too much leaf burn in late summer.

    High humidity is in your favor as well as the fact that you get cool nights giving the tree a break and allowing it to manufacture food. You could always give it a shot, all you have to lose is the tree.

    Have you considered another form of Maple? Shantung, Amur, Brandywine all might be worth considering. Maybe a Paperbark Maple (Acer Gresium). Beautiful tree. They tend to require some late afternoon shade during the hottest part of summer in my climate but likely would be OK in yours.

    Ultimately, you need to do some research and inquire at reputable local nurseries as to how any/all of these trees perform in your climate with the anticipated conditions. All we can really do is speculate. Most Japanese Maple websites and books provide information on growing conditions that simply does not apply to hot climates. As a result, we need to work hard to find out this information from those who have experience growing Japanese Maples where we live.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2007
  6. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    I'll second Blake's recommendation of the paperbark maple, A. griseum. A beautiful and trouble free maple with great year round interest.

    The Shantung or Purpleblow maple is A. truncatum, it appears to do quite well in southern US climes. A great tree, as attractive as A. palmatum ssp palmatum to my view. The Amur maple A. tartaricum is tough as old boots, I imagine it would do well too. One of my favorite maples is A. cappidocicum ssp sinicum, it is a gorgeous smallish tree, red-bronze young growth, very elegant leaves, pretty flowers, red samaras, nice habit. Takes sun well, although I'm not sure how tough it would be in your climate I'll bet easier than palmatum.

    Say, what's a Brandywine maple?

    -E
     
  7. hanl

    hanl Active Member

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    Check out Fireglow, Emperior One, Bloodgood or Green Maple.
     
  8. blake

    blake Active Member 10 Years

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  9. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Hi Colagal is possible to cultivate maple in hot conditions!( i live in central Italy) if:
    1)Umidity around the trunk costant
    2) use pine bark around trunk
    3) if possible sun in morning shade in afteroom
    4)good fertilize two time for year
    etc.etc.for cultivar i according whit Ron you see the garden around you garden and ask ,ask !!!!However i have Osakazuki,Dissectum,Butterfly,Fire glow,Koshi mino and Hazemorino in full sun ;for the 1 or 2 year the leaves in summer have brown margins after this period in summer remain green ......
     
  10. colagal

    colagal Member

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    alex66,
    Thanks for the tips! I have just come home with a sango-kaku (coral bark japanese maple) so I will give this one a try. I have been watching a spot in my yard very carefully and it will not get blasted with sun all day but will unfortunately get sun for about 4 hours in the afternoon :( However, I am going to give it a try. Lots of moisture and mulch.

    What type of fertilizer do you recommend?
    Thanks again for your input.
     
  11. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    I use in late autum whit mature fertilize (xxxxx) of cow or hourse or another animals ,in start spring whit Nitroposka Blu special (Compo brand),Sango Kaku is a good choise!...
     
  12. hbflair

    hbflair Member

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    Location:
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    Colagal, I live about 30 min south of you and have had some luck with JM's in FULL sun. Consistant moisture is extremely important, especially with smaller trees that are not established. I have talked with several people around the area and they have said that although there JM's burned during the first few years of growth but once they get older and are well established they do not burn as easily in full sun. I have an 'Emporor I', 'Shishigahria', 'Omeryama', a green seedling and 'Tamukeyama'(small) in full sun. My 'Omeryama' and seedling green do the best (very little burn if any). The 'Shishigahria' has some burn but has been neglected, 'Emporor I' burned pretty good, and the 'Tamukeyama' has lost its leaves but survived. I have a 'Sango Kaku', 'Bloodgood' and 'Red Select' that recieve about 6 hours of sun and they are ok. Little burn. I am experimenting with 'Greenhornet', 'Waterfall', 'Verdis', 'Acontifolium', 'Green Cascade', 'Osakazuki', and 'Suminugashi'. So far I think these need some protection from that 12-7 sun in July and August. Try not to fertilize too much (especially Nitrogen). Your JM's root system needs to be able to keep up with the top growth, and make sure you mulch. This spring and summer has especially brutal. Good luck with your maples!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2007

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